Minorities In Special Education

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Zhang, Katsiyannis, Ju and Roberts (2014) found the representation of minorities has not changed enough to see a well-rounded representation of ethnicities in special education. More so, the authors have seen a reduction in students of African descent with Intellectual Disabilities (ID). This is not surprising, as diagnosis of ID in students with African descent cannot occur. The reduction comes from the lack of ability to label students rather than the diagnosis being more culturally sensitive to minority students. Additionally, the lack of ability to diagnosis an ID can create issues itself. Diagnosis of students with an Intellectual Disability may receive incorrect, to correct for the law (Zhang et al., 2014). Zhang et al. (2014) …show more content…
Specifically, the reception of these students was with less warmth and acceptance in comparison minority students in general education (Markova, Markova, Ti-Ten Cate, Krolak-Schwerdt, & Glock, 2016). According to the authors, exacerbation of this perception occurred when including special education services for individuals with behavioral problems such as ADHD. Teachers assessed and perceived individuals with immigrant status less favorably in comparison to individuals without that status (Markova et al., 2016). Markova et al. (2016) connects well with the idea that teachers act in ways to relieve stress in their own understanding of students who are minorities. This concept, introduced by Harber et al., (2012), discussed teachers providing more positive responses to student work. Markova et al. (2016) found teachers made conscious efforts to respond without bias toward students who are minorities. The efforts made by school staff may be motivated toward reducing the feelings of anxiety than toward bettering minority student’s educational development (Markova et al., 2016; Harber et al., …show more content…
From the literature, there are areas of growth for future consideration. The research seems to indicate minority students are subject to undue stress when understanding the school ecology (Tenenbaum and Ruck, 2007). This is influenced by the use of the dominate cultural lens to understand minority cultural practice (Epstein et al., 2005). Reschly (1981) argued that the individuals who are providing and interpreting the data might be as much at fault as the assessments themselves when examining qualification for special education services and ADHD

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