Harlem Renaissance: The New Negro

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“The New Negro” is a self-expression that speaks for itself meaning “a new type of negro” or black person. In the north during the Harlem Renaissance, black people were becoming independent. They started branching off making their own art, music, and poetry, and opening their own businesses and forming their own new communities. Now there was a “New Negro” as opposed to the “Old Negro”; a black man with a slave mentality. The “Old Negro” was a black man who viewed himself as inferior, the black man who doesn’t think for himself. However the “New Negro” of the 21st century has expand their natural gifts, but still face segregation. The 1920s was a decade of creativity for black Americans that were living in New York City, particularly Harlem. …show more content…
“We used to lament this as the falling off of our friends; now the Negro must rejoice and pray to be delivered both from self-pity and condescension” (Locke 977). Locke is saying that for the Negro he must know himself and be known for who he is. “Subtly the conditions that are molding a New Negro are molding a new America” (Locke 978). This was an important time in the black community, which called for more understanding and justice gain. In this time the Renaissance had caused a postive shift in the black community. Whereas in the black community the injustice of killing innocent blacks has caused a negative shift. They were now able to inspire one another, as they developed a new beginning of expressionism within the black community. He states this because he knew the race relationship is not understood, but there will be more prejudice to come. Locke was accurate noting that more prejudice days were to come because, now in the 21st century white on black crimes has become a major …show more content…
In an article Williamson states that the “21st Century New Negro would enlighten and awaken blacks in America, in terms of their consciousness and how they see themselves in society.” Before it was the cultural, artistic social explosion within the black community, but now the black community has joined together in a Black Lives Matter movement. Although many barriers have been overcome for the black man in America, Locke believed that “each generation, however, will have its creed, and that of the present is the belief in the efficacy of collective effort, in race cooperation” (Locke 978). However, today the black community cries out as much as the “Old Negro” having to watch their brothers and sisters die by the hands of the white man. And although the “Old Negroes” were also defenseless and weak; the Black Lives Matter and social movements in support of the African American community show some strength and the resistance which would more like be compared to the “ New Negro”. Once again the blacks of America is trying to become equal into the main stream society. At the same time the blacks of the 21st century voice is still trying to be heard while seeking

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