Religious Conflict In The Renaissance

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The Renaissance is known as the transition from the medieval times to the early modern world. It pushed everyone towards a new generation. Along with the Renaissance came new aspects, and the ability to question one’s authority. This was good for the present day people, as they became wise and better able to comprehend the power they had. Nonetheless, the Renaissance had negatively affected the Catholic Church. As more people became aware of the faulty jurisdiction of the Catholic Church, the power the Church had diminished. Religious conflict is one of the major themes throughout the Renaissance. This had an effect on many people, one of which was King Henry VIII. Religious conflicted caused Henry VIII to Break away from Rome, Claim the Church …show more content…
So he had decided to to take over the Church of England. He was guided by his chancellor Thomas Cromwell. To take over the Church of England from the Pope’s control, he had Parliament pass numerous laws. He had appointed his own archbishop, and had his marriage annulled. And in 1534, he had the Parliament pass the Act of Supremacy, which made Henry the supreme head of the Church of England. Whoever did not believe in the law was executed. King Henry VIII died in 1547, and Edward VI inherited the throne. Edward and his Protestants began to make England a Protestant country. Edward’s Parliament had laws passed that brought a Protestant reform to England. Later, Queen Elizabeth drew up a compromise between Protestant and Catholic practices. This ended decades of religious turmoil. She kept many Catholic traditions, but made England a protestant nation. Religious conflict is one of the major themes that runs throughout the Renaissance and the effects this conflict had on Henry VIII was monumetal. The Religious conflicts caused Henry VIII to Break away from Rome, Claim the Church of England, and turn England into a Protestant nation. However, this chaos helped shape many mindscapes, and helped develop the nation now known as

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