Religion In The 1500s

Superior Essays
Introduction
Throughout history religion has been an influential factor in the way society and politics have evolved to this day. One of which; Christianity, it has had one of the most noticeable impacts on the world we know today. During the middle ages the Holy Roman Empire which was the embassy for Roman Catholicism was the strongest force of power and politics in the 1400’s . While the church had divine power over Europe it also abused its rule by monetizing faith and spreading it to the people. This urged for change and reformation through the religion. Even though the Reformation of the 1500-1700 was based around faith it became just as much involved in political matter as it did religious.

The power of the Church in the 1500s was
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Luther began his studies with Law, but one day he was struck by lightning and cried “Help me Saint Anne, I will become a monk” Adopting the monk hood Luther had begun learnings of the Bible and studying it incisively at his study place of Wittenberg (Germany). He then visited Rome to discover the Churches relaxed approach to their methods and rules of the Bible itself. Then after he discovered writings from Saint Paul the Apostle quotes in Romans 1:17 “The just shall live by faith” Meaning that to be righteous you don’t need to Prayer, Fast or do any action a person can take to help one’s faith. While the acknowledgement of this Luther had come into contact with a Friar who had been selling Indulgences which was a purchased guarantee from the Pope that it will reduce one’s time in Purgatory*. Luther however did not find this monetization of faith very just at all. Believing his people -(Often impoverished) were paying large sums of money for a meaningless piece of paper. Then came his action Luther wrote out a list stating his critiques of the sale of Indulgences. After placing this on the door to the church for the whole world to see his claim began to grow in accusation. Starting off with claiming the church had no spiritual power above its fellow man, then going to digress that priesthood was an advent by the church itself. This meant Luther …show more content…
Even through mass discussion and opposition the change was made. His processes of such was morally questionable as he wanted to spilt from his wife of twenty years Catherine of Aragon (1485-1536) For multiple reasons including multiple miscarriages and allure of a mistress. But while filing for divorce (annulment of vows) through the Popes consent for dispensation, King henry was then denied divorce. After this King Henry was exposed to the writings of one William Tyndale (1494-1536) Whom had completed many works such as a Bible translation from Latin to English and much like Martin Luther had followed on and had created writings critiquing the church. Tyndale notes about how he thinks society should sweep away the powers of the earthly church and get back to people worshipping god. These writings had swayed King Henry to think. Congregating his parliament to: The Act of Supremacy (1534). He then for the first time in history spilt the Church of England from The Roman Catholic Church. This all came from King Henrys journey through parliament to sway them to allow Henry to become the head of the English Church because they like Tyndale didn’t trust the power of the Roman Catholic Church. There was now Royal Supremacy over the church in which altered political scape of England. Not only was Henry

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