Relativism In Life Of Pi

950 Words 4 Pages
Why is Donald Trump so hated by some voters in America and embraced so enthusiastically by others? The answer might have something to do with worldviews, which affect the things people say, think, and do. For example, Abraham Kuyper had a worldview that many Christians adopted. Kuyper said, “There is not a square inch in the whole domain of our human existence over which Christ, who is Sovereign over all, does not cry, Mine!”. Kuyper 's belief in the absolute truth of the Gospel contrasts sharply with the popular idea of relativism. In relativism, no absolute truths exist because people interpret truth differently relative to their cultural, societal, and historical context. In the book Life of Pi, author Yann Martel relates Pi’s belief in …show more content…
Martel introduces Pi’s belief in relative truth early in the book when Pi adopts two new religions. First, Pi meets with a Christian priest and, after hearing the story of Jesus, he accepts Christianity. However, as Pi leaves the Christian church he heads straight to the Hindu place of worship. Pi likes the story of Christianity, so he decides he will be a Christian; however, because of his belief in relativism, he does not accept all parts of the religions he practices. Pi believes that each religion worships the same god, so it does not matter which a person believes is true. Pi believes people should choose their religion based on the story that best fits the way they wish to live. When Pi is confronted by leaders from his religions and told he needs to pick one he responds by saying "Bapu Gandhi said, ‘All religions are true.’ I just want to love God" (Martel, 69). Pi believes that as long as he loves god the specifics of his faith do not …show more content…
He wants the reader to not believe things because they have been told or heard; instead, he tries to convince the reader to accept their own interpretations as truth. It does not matter what is believed, only that something is believed. After all, “Hindus, in their capacity for love, are indeed hairless Christians, just as Muslims, in the way they see God in everything, are bearded Hindus, and Christians, in their devotion to God, are hat-wearing Muslims” (50). Martel attempts to imprint his own worldview on the reader by subtly making them question the value of truth. After reading the book, a person may question things that before they had taken as an absolute

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