Relationships In Relationship In William Shakespeare's Much Ado About Nothing

1196 Words 5 Pages
People should, depending on situation and their motivation, get involved in relationships, whether for better or worse. Benedick constantly quarrelled with Beatrice, swearing that “until all graces be in one woman, one woman shall not come in my grace” (Shakespeare, 2.3.29). But when Benedick overheard Don Pedro and Leonato discussing Beatrice’s love for him, he began to soften up to Beatrice. Likewise, Beatrice fell in love with Benedick when she eavesdropped on a conversation explaining Benedick’s wholehearted yet concealed love for Beatrice. Without the help of Leonato, Don Pedro, Hero, and Ursula, Benedick and Beatrice would have still been fighting with each other. Likewise, Claudio relentlessly slandered Hero on their wedding day. Hero, …show more content…
Claudio, convinced of Hero’s infidelity, barbarously besmirched Hero in front of her friends and family, ruining her reputation and wrecking their relationship. However, the Friar, confident of Hero’s innocence, persuaded Leonato to publish that Hero died from Claudio’s slander. The Friar assured Leonato that “this well carried shall on her behalf change slander to remorse. … [She] shall be lamented, pitied, and excused of every hearer, … and so will it fare with Claudio” (Shakespeare, 4.1.221-233). As the Friar predicted, when Claudio heard of Hero’s “death,” he rues his relentless and irreverent obloquy. He went to Hero’s “grave” and ceremoniously mourned his to-be bride’s death. Regretful, Claudio returned to Leonato. Claudio demanded Leonato to “choose your revenge yourself. Impose me to what penance your invention can lay upon my sin” (Shakespeare, 5.1.283-286), allowing Leonato to ask him to do anything and he would do it. Leonato informed him that he has a niece that he would have him marry instead of Hero. Gratefully, Claudio agreed to these terms. After giving his vows, Claudio unveiled his new bride and finds “another Hero” (Shakespeare, 5.4.63). As with Benedick and Beatrice, Claudio and Hero’s relationship was almost beyond repair. If not for the Friar and Leonato, Claudio, along with everyone else, would have …show more content…
In Shakespeare’s Much Ado About Nothing, there are multiple instances wherein people becoming involved in other’s relationships, for better and for worse. Benedick and Beatrice hated each other, but, with the encouragement of a few friends, they learned to love each other and got married. Likewise, Claudio basically despised Hero, but, with the help of the Friar and Leonato, happily married her. However, there also is an example of a situation in which involvement is not encouraged because of motives. Don Jon wanted to ruin Claudio’s happiness and succeeds in his aspiration by heartlessly ravaging Hero’s reputation in front of everyone she cared about. Because Don Jon’s motives were in opposition to Claudio and Hero’s happiness, he should not have been getting involved in their relationship. The situation is different in each instance, but for the most part the deciding factor in whether or not to get involved in other’s relationship is essentially

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