Essay On The Relationship Between Of Mice And Men And The American Dream

1469 Words 6 Pages
A stable income and a nice family is usually the picture that pops into people’s heads when discussing the American Dream. The American Dream idea plays a major role in the novel Of Mice and Men and the play A Raisin in the Sun. Because the American Dream plays a huge role in the pieces, all of the main characters have their own American Dream. The effects of having an American Dream to chase and then losing the dream are different on the relationships between characters in Of Mice and Men compared to those of A Raisin in the Sun. In the novel, Of Mice and Men, the relationships of the characters strengthen because they bond over sharing the same dream. George and Lennie have a strong brotherly relationship which develops even more with the …show more content…
As the novel goes on, Candy is introduced and shares the same dream with Lennie and George and sharing the dream brings the three of them really close. Because there isn’t a lot to do while working, it gives them something to bond over. Especially since people migrating for jobs don’t really have relationships with everyone, this makes the trio’s relationship a unique one. They all share hopes and values. Lennie and George respect Candy a lot because he is investing the most in the ranch and makes the dream an actual possibility. The trio talk about plans for the ranch constantly for example Candy talks about making “some money on them rabbits if [they] do about it right” (Steinbeck 75). Having a shared dream makes them work together and they all pitch in hopes to see the ranch become a reality. Bonding over the dream of owning a ranch, the trio’s relationship strengthens throughout their journey. In A Raisin in the Sun, because everyone is chasing his or her own dream, the Younger family seems like it is being torn apart. The first piece of …show more content…
Walter makes the family proud when he decides “‘to move into [their] house because [his] father--[his] father--he earned it for [them] brick by brick’”(Hansberry 575). The family finally gives him genuine respect because they feel he made the right choice and held the family’s pride up. He chose to have dignity as opposed to being fearful to the world. Because the family believes Walter made the right choice, one that satisfied everyone, the family become closer and the relationship of the family strengthens. Walter’s choice brought the family together because they finally accepted each other (Bloom). At the end, Walter sacrifices his hopes for the dream and becomes selfless. Because he has sacrificed his dreams, he will start helping the others attain their dreams. For example, by following through with the house plan, he will be able to provide a good place for his son to sleep instead of the couch and Mama will get the garden she has always dreamed about. Because he is able to be prideful and not sell the house, he fights the racism that is talked about in Babacar M'Baye’s literary criticism that talks about how the “forces of segregation, racism, intolerance, and violence.” Losing the dream doesn’t always affect in negative outcomes as shown by the Younger

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