Native American Relationship

After reading the text provided I came to the conclusion that the relationship between the Native Americans and the United States was in constant turmoil. The text is littered with many treaties made with the Natives and the effect these had on all parties involved. The westward expansion caused numerous battles and debates among the politicians and tribes. A quote from the article A Shawnee Argues for an Untied Indian Resistance, 1810 states “After mistreatment of the Native Americans by Presidents Jefferson and Madison, Tecumseh, a Shawnee, tried to organize the Midwestern Indian tribes into a united political alliance to thwart the steady advance of the white settlers.” This quote shows the strained relationship between the Natives and the …show more content…
Sending Settlers even further west and the encroachment of the pioneers in and around the Native Americans land lead to several incidents of killing, kidnapping and violence among them. In the article “A Pioneer Woman in Post-Revolutionary Kentucky” Jane Stevenson tells her memories of attacks by Native Americans. “The first of March 1781, John Brookey went out to cut the first log to build his house. The Indians thought to take him. They shot him through the shoulder. The company from Lexington went out in a few minutes (they heard the gun).” She was a young child and just happen to be getting a pail of water when this incident happened. John Brookey was saved. Stories of Native American raids, scalping and murders are scattered through our history books and stories. While these stories are important parts of American history, they were not the only outlet for angry Natives. Battles were fought between the Native Americans and the armies of the United States. The battle of Tippecanoe (1811) was fought against Prophetstown. Prophetstown was a major force of resistance from the United States and the win over Prophetstown was celebrated as a huge victory for the …show more content…
A quote from the appeal of the Cherokee Nation article states “We wish to remain on the land of our fathers. We have a prefect and original right to claim this without interruption or molestation.” The Supreme court said they had no legal standing because they were not foreign or US citizens. A year later the Cherokee went back to the supreme court with a missionary hoping that this time the court would hear their case. In the case Worcester V. Georgia (1832) the court upheld the territorial sovereignty of the Cherokee. This was due to the fact that they had created a community and occupied its own territory. They lived in peace for 2 more years than in 1835 a treaty was signed selling all their land and they were removed. Under armaments, the Cherokee was evacuated in May of 1838 and forced to walk 1,200 miles which became known as the Trail of Tears. Nearly a quarter of the Cherokees died en route from the hardship. While the American government might have believed they were acting in the best interest of both parties the evidence shows

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