Music Subcultures

Superior Essays
How music eras and genres participate in social change and correspond to ideologies through subcultures in the 20th century
Research paper

Table of Contents
Goal of this paper 3
Introduction 3
Social change in modernity 3
Technological development’s impact on music culture 4
Eras of popular music in the 20th century 5
Rock and Roll 5
Pop 7
Beat 8
Rock 9

Goal of this paper

In this work I will:
- Show, how music eras take place in the context of social change
- Present the main genres in popular music of the 20th century
- Analyse the connection between music eras and subcultures, ideologies

Introduction

Social change in modernity

According to Giddens social change is the process in which basic underlying structures of social institutions
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To be more specific the centralization of these resources in hands of international recording companies (major labels) is what made it possible for specific music genres to reach a remarkable amount of people and because of this affecting human culture in a global perspective. Popular genres always had the backing of Major labels. This is logical because those being profit oriented companies were always looking for products that were the easiest to sell.
By the principles of economics people make decisions by evaluating lots of independent factors like their needs, their possibilities, sacrifices they have to make. In some cases, even their personality influences these decisions as well as cultural factors. Listening to a specific genre of music is such a decision by my opinion. Writing lyrics is an activity closely related to literature which often has the means to express political critique, universal values or personal experiences. Even if these key elements are not represented in every song/lyrics they actually have to do a lot with the societal context in music is
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They represented a counter-culture standing up against the standard narrative values of their parents. Instead of those they believed in liberation related to certain things. Experimental use of psychedelic drugs like peyote, yage, LSD all together with marijuana, morphine and alcohol was one of these for instance as part of the wider term spiritual liberation. This also involved a form of sexual liberation. Holding together all of these values was the culture’s reformative attitude against censorship. These are the main values represented through beat music and literature. Lyrics for the first time represented opinions, experiences about corruption and unhappiness. It expressed that bad things like depression, unfaithfulness, promiscuity all together with sexuality were topics needing debate and should not be casualties of censorship or taboo. All of these ought to fulfil an alienation from traditional values.

On this ground happened a very prominent change in the art of music. First of all, artists become a reactive element of this part of the society. They started to express opinions, stood up for things and took their part in transforming ideas ruling debate within the society. Long Play albums also were invented at this time which made it possible to express deeper concepts opening new doors for creativity in music. The Beatles was the first band to successfully reach an international audience thanks to their manager Brian

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