Reid's Criteria For Benevolence In Pursuit Of The Greater Good? Discuss

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It is apparent that the mind of man is far evolved from that of animals, and Reid helps us to understand that it is reason that secures this notion. My questioning would then be: since reason is applied in the commencement of all of our actions, and judgment influences reason by default, wouldn’t a decision to obtain resources to relieve one’s hunger be evolved as well? The instinctive bodily reactions to hunger and thirst are primal, yes, however, for men of maturity, there is the inescapable prologue of choice. The initiative to fulfill these needs is automatically flooded with awareness and judgment, ergo, what was once an animalistic principle has become rational by the endowment of reason. An example of this rationale may be as simple …show more content…
Subsequent contributions to additional progress will come in addressing Reid’s assertion of benevolence in pursuit of the greater good. Regard to the whole of the society is another element of Reid’s criteria for benevolence. He holds that, due to our rational nature, we are instinctively inclined to engage in those activities that will bring benefit to our fellow man, promoting the prosperity of our society. Reid explains that all individuals are born with the intrinsic desire to assist that whole of which they are a component, and the rationale behind the desired cooperation with this whole comes later in life as one develops an understanding. In the earlier stages of life we learn what we like and what we do not like, developing preferences, and these are the sole properties that either sway us toward seeking or avoiding an object or situation. It is only as one matures and expands his state of mind that he is able to recognize those aversions that may prove to benefit him and the greater good, and which attractions may in effect bring harm. This learned realization is another example of …show more content…
However, if society as a whole is the supposed object of one’s affection that is himself a citizen of that society, there is the accompaniment of personal gain. To say that this individual’s well being does not have any influence on the force that drives the action seems generous and naive. Few species are not familiar with the notion that there is power in numbers; an individual undoubtedly has a much higher chance of survival with a group than he would alone. While the individual may utilize innate and developed rational principles that encourage him to make choices for the benefit of the whole or the greater good, he is still a member of that society. If the community is able to flourish, he in turn will reap those benefits. To call this a selfish act may be an inaccurate exaggeration, but it is certainly not

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