Syrian Government

2087 Words 9 Pages
A Powerful Government and Its Hopeless Citizens The struggling people of a country reflects the role of a totalitarian government. Syria has become a divided country because the president, Bashar al-Assad, has done little to nothing to unify and help his people. There has been an emergence of an ethnical divide to overthrow the government because the majority of the country—Sunnis—wants a democracy, while the opposing side—Shiites—is staying loyal to Bashar and the government. The downfall of the country is not only affecting the people from within, but it has seeped into other countries, especially the Middle Eastern region. Other nations are joining to help aid Syrians because the president and government is neglecting their people. However, …show more content…
Syrians have always been inclined to overthrow the government, but they never had the courage to. The government’s tyrannical reigns were exceptionally powerful. The Syrians needed an incentive that would invoke a sense of passion and confidence to fight against the government. In Aj Jazeera’s “Syria’s Civil War Explained” he claims that with the “Arab Spring” revolts and protests in Tunisia and Egypt, the Syrians finally sparked a demonstration against Bashar and the government (Jazeera). Admirably, they confronted the government peacefully. A group of boys expressed their discontent with the government by “writing graffiti in support of the Arab Spring” (Jazeera). From Yazgan et al in “Syrian Crisis and Migration” they say the country has been unstable and has experienced “chain military coups from the beginning of its foundation”. Bashar threatened his country by killing the placid protesters. Those boys were detained and tortured, which led an eleven-year-old child to die after been mutilated. Bashar demanded these actions on children. Children are a symbol of innocence, and their actions reflected that as well. The enactment of violence caused the majority of the country to ignite with rage. An outbreak of the Syrian Civil War has been known to be the “worst refugee crisis since WWII” (Yazgan). In terms of a cessation of war, Syrians desperately need political …show more content…
In Francois Heisbourg’s “The Strategic Implications of the Syrian Refugee” describes Germany has opened up their gates to over half a million civilians seeking or securing abode within the European Union and those numbers are exponentially increasing. Germany has become the center of Europe’s response to the refugee crisis. However, the excessive migration of Syrian refugees into their border has accelerated their economy and fueled political movements. Even with $2.5 billion assessed to the UNHCR-United Nations High Commissioner for Refugees-it is not enough to provide Syrian refugees a sustainable life (Heisbourg). Europe’s decisions have caused problems within their own countries for taking on other countries’ problems. A rising conflict of xenophobia has been fueled by the asylum seekers-the Syrian refugees-and a push towards sovereignty. France’s regional elections in December of 2015 confirmed a shift to sovereignty. Even Berlin disregarded Germany’s action to open up their doors (Heisbourg). Greece was reluctant to receive refugees into their country because they were in a middle of an economic crisis. Since they couldn’t handle it, Greece eventually sealed their border with Turkey years earlier. The EU didn’t have the sufficient means to aid the refugee because they couldn’t support themselves. Not surprisingly, this

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