Reform Movements In The 19th Century

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In the 19th century, in America women were seen often as subscruent to men. As, the country progress, women in America began to develop the power that helped the nation evolve. The social gospel that develop from the Second Great Awakening started a social justice movement that affected the problems of abolition of slavery, prison and asylum, education, temperance movement and women 's rights. I believe the five key major reform movements of the early 19th century (abolition of slavery, prison and asylum, education, temperance movement and women 's rights) are directly attributed to women 's new social gospel from the Second Great Awakening.

Women often were not directly involved in the political system; however, women were usually be found working tirelessly in the abolishment of slavery. As the Second Great Awakening came around. Women saw the equality among the different ethnic groups in America. In the 19th century, “the organization of an American Anti-Slavery Society to take place in Philadelphia.” As the Anti-Slavery convention of American
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Women wanted to start a movement that focus on the rights for women. The Second Great Awakening had many Christian women joined the women right movement. Lucretia, Mott Susan B. Anthony and Elizabeth Cady Stanton were the three main women that started the Women Suffrage in America. The Seneca Falls Convention was the first convention that illustrated the women’s rights. The main intention of the convention was to have a guaranteed amendment that allowed women to vote. Women wanted the right to vote to feel part of the nation. Susan B. Anthony declared the “Declaration of Rights for Women at the Independence Hall in the Philadelphia. Which the United State Congress proposed the Women Suffrage Amendment. States gradually accepted the Women Suffrage movement. The Nineteenth Amendment was passed for any United States citizen the right to vote, including

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