Reflective Sales Management

2104 Words 8 Pages
Introduction William “Skip” Miller wrote the book titled ProActive Sales Management: How to Lead, Motivate, and Stay ahead of the Game. In his book, Miller lists the tools necessary for becoming an effective sales manager (Miller 2001). It should be noted that “All Bible references in this paper come from the” New “King James Version of the Bible, except where clearly noted by the student” (Skorupa 2010). Commencing with the first chapter and ending with the tenth chapter, Miller gives a thorough discussion on the elements necessary for changing a reactionary manager into a “ProActive” one (Miller 2001, 1-24). For that reason, this paper will “summarize, analyze,” and “evaluate” the material presented by Miller (Newburgh Theological Seminary …show more content…
Miller speaks of four categories that contribute to this, which includes time management, preparation, measurable “objectives,” and a metric for sales performance (Miller 2001, 43-64). In terms of time management, Miller explains how three categories of employees exist that include: 1) “A”=upper performing, 2) “B”=middle performing, and 3) “C”=lower performing salespeople (Miller 2001, 43-64). Miller further elaborates on the problem that sales managers face when violating the “80/20 rule” by investing the majority of their time with lower performing employees, which in turn leads to a “culture” where top performers are penalized at the expense of lower performing employees (Miller 2001, 43-64). In terms of preparation, Miller suggests an hour a day to one’s self in the mornings over a “five” day period to adequately prepare for each day’s challenges (Miller 2001, 43-64). In terms of measurable “objectives,” Miller recommends utilizing an “S.O.S. Pyramid” that encompasses a “Situational analysis,” “M2O/ts,” and “Strategies” to measure employee performance on both “objective” and “subjective measurements” rather than basing it solely on numerical values (Miller 2001, 43-64). However, doing so will require measuring “Revenue/Performance, Sales Competency,” and “Frequency,” which is stated in the following mathematical equation: “R = F x C” (Miller …show more content…
The first round would involve lower-level management conducting as many employment negotiations with potential job applicants at the beginning of the day using a laid-back public environment that last approximately no more than a half hour. Naturally, Miller advises shortening the time if lower-level management has determined that the applicant is not a right fit for the job. Making this determination would entail establishing rapport with the applicant, drawing from him or her the needed knowledge concerning past employment and other data, and then testing the job candidate on his or her motivation to succeed in sales by allowing him or her to take over the conversation where lower-level management would end the employment negotiation with an explanation of the three-tier hiring procedure. After this has been completed, Miller then suggest dwindling the potential job applicants down to no more than “three” people for the second round (Miller 2001, 65-128). In the second round, middle management would receive the “Profile Sheet” from lower-level management to conduct another tier of employment negotiations (Miller 2001, 65-128). In the third round, potential job applicants would be asked to attend an employment negotiation that involves groups to determine their overall cultural fit to the

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