Personal Narrative: A Moment Of Injustice

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Elementary school was hard. Sitting amongst a group of porcelain children and being asked to pass the “skin colour” crayon erupted looks of confusion and guilt. As a result of that moment of disconcertion and shame, my golden-toned hand drew the epitome of an Aryan child for what was supposed to be my self portrait. That picture was hung up on my grade one classroom’s wall- much to my satisfaction and my parents’ confusion. In retrospect, I could easily dismiss this as the childish need to fit in. However, when looking at this moment through today’s intense racially aware society, it can easily be interpreted as a moment of injustice. Injustice to my own identity, self esteem and most of all to my family who I had witnessed proudly wearing …show more content…
The people who are the true epitome of Canadian, yet they are still ridiculed and and ignored by other Canadians and even the governments. In Canada’s mosaic of immigrants and settlers who have been here for centuries, where do the First Nations fit? Possibly on the outer edge of the mosaic, like the reservations that they have been subjected to for generations. Perhaps they are hidden behind other pieces in the metaphorical mural, the realities of their adversity hidden behind greed, Eurocentrism and ignorance. The dual identity that allows balance in the lives of immigrants and their children likely cannot work the same way for Indigenous Peoples. For immigrants who move to Canada, the dual identity is a way of keeping true to their homeland while adapting to their new home. Therefore, how can Indigenous people do this when this is both their homeland and new home? I cannot speak for the Indigenous population. Though, I acknowledge their struggles regarding their identities that expects First Nations to be caricatures of themselves. Thomas King in his novel “The inconvenient Indian” refers to the most common Indigenous caricature as “the dead Indian.” For him and other Indigenous People, “being invisible is annoying enough, but being inauthentic is crushing” (King 64). This authenticity that King speaks of is the trouble with the Aboriginal dual identity- almost always will there be a sacrifice or undertone of inauthenticity. Overall, Canada’s reputation of multiculturalism brings about pride. Though underneath the colourful mosaic that is this country lies the struggles of dual-identity, guilt and fear of appearing inauthentic. There is an undermining, endless adversity of minorities to be just the right amount of Canadian mixed with their designated ethnicity. Therefore, Canada’s multiculturalism is a flawed yet admirable concept, just like the

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