Reflection Paper On Transition Times

1680 Words 7 Pages
Transitions are an integral part of the classroom procedures. Transition times can be the most chaotic times of the day in any classroom setting. Transitions are defined as the times during the day when children move or change from one activity to another. These actives could include entering in the classroom, moving to different centers, going to lunch or recess and even going home. Transition times have to be planned carefully and implemented early, because by minimizing transition, we can then maximize the time children spend engaging in developmentally appropriate actives. The transition times that I observed where going to the bathroom, and changing actives in a third grade classroom. I would say that the transition for bathroom breaks …show more content…
He has a very nice smile and does so often. He has short black hair and brown eyes. He enjoys playing baseball and soccer, very athletic. Jane a Caucasian female, age 12 five feet tall. She has blonde hair and green eyes. Shy, sometimes timid. Likes to run during recess, has a close net of friends. Learning skill should be the first skill you develop because it greatly helps you develop other skills. An essential ingredient to have good learning skill is motivation. If you are motivated to learn about a subject, it will be much easier for you to learn it. The teacher knew that most of the girls in her class are all reading this book series. So to get them interested in and motivated to study she started to quiz them every day in a no stressful environment to help them develop study …show more content…
Telling children to be quite and 2. Telling children to settle down. One I observed in my preschool classroom and two I observed in my third grade room. Silencing methods, such as flicking the lights, ringing a call bell, raising two fingers, saying "Attention, class," or using Harry Wong 's Give Me 5 a command for students to: 1. Focus their eyes on the speaker 2. Be quiet 3.Be still 4. Empty their hands 5. Listen. There is also the "three fingers" version, which stands for stop, look, and listen. To calm students down simply start the lesson, even while the children are talking to each other. Start with a statement that would surprise them. For example, if the lesson is about shapes, show a big circle and say, “This IS a square.” Someone will notice that it is not a square, and you can smile and say, “Oh, I tried to trick you. You were paying attention.” A surprise opening, used with any topic, is usually enough to peak their interest. They could play a game called the TWO-THINGS-AT-THE-SAME-TIME game. This game to help children enjoy listening. Say, “I can tap my knee and roll my arms AT THE SAME TIME.” Then ask, “What can you do AT THE SAME TIME?” One child said, “I can rub my tummy and sing.” Then say, “I can NOT roll my arms and tap my head AT THE SAME TIME. What can you NOT do AT THE SAME TIME?” One boy said, “I cannot laugh and cry,” and another, “I can’t hold my nose and breathe.” When the

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