Crazy Reflection

Superior Essays
Crazy Reflection The book explores the relationship of a father and a son diagnosed with a schizophrenia and a further investigation into the healthcare system in America relating mental health. The author looks at mental health care in prisons, judicial system, police force, support groups, and a variety of people with close ties to the mental health community. He dives deep into how mental health is dealt with in our country. Throughout the book, he shines light on the problems and areas needed for improvement in mental health. From a nursing standpoint, the book made me realize how important it is for people with mental health to be compliant with their medications and how important it is for healthcare providers to be advocating for these …show more content…
In clinical I’m at a unit that only can hold a maximum of 20 patients, and none of them are there longer than a few weeks maximum. A big difference is how the patients are treated in clinical versus the book. In clinical, the patients are treated with respect and are getting adequate treatment from a staff team who genuinely wants to help them. In the book, there are many stories where people involved with people with mental illness don’t have the best intentions. A lot of people in the book are mistreated and aren’t getting the treatment they need. There’s various stories of people with mental illness getting slipped through the cracks, injured, forgotten about, neglected, and even killed. The similarities I’ve seen relate to the justice system and mental health. A lot of patients in clinical come from jail or end up back in jail after they leave clinical. Another similarity I’ve seen are the symptoms people are experiencing with mental illness. The most concerning thing to me is how people with mental illness are treated in all …show more content…
According to Fraser, 2009 young offenders are 18 times more likely to commit suicide in prison, and 95% have a mental health problem, 60-65% of prisoners suffer from a mental health problem and / or drug dependency, and eight out ten women suffer from a diagnosable mental health problem. The article discusses the need for a radical change when addressing mental illness, and the issues needs to be taken more seriously. In prison the resources, facilities, and clinical skills are inadequate, and prisons aren’t equipped with a therapeutic environment (Fraser, 2009). “Prison is not a place to receive people for whom society has no other answers. It is not a place to go if you are acutely mentally ill, or if your offending is driven primarily by the state of your mind It is not a place to go as a ‘pre-paid’ public service that is easier, less awkward and less visible to the public eye and public finances than other, more appropriate, alternatives” (Fraser, 2009). Within my psychiatric clinical experience, I’m seeing a positive side of treating mental illness. The providers and staff members want to be there and help the patients get the proper treatment. Overall, there are problems with mental illness, but there are also solutions. I believe proper education and working with multi-disciplinary teams who are working towards a common

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