Reflection On A Child's Experience In The Stages Of Human Development

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During my time in the Human Development course, I studied and learned the stages of cognitive development at which a child develops and the different things that affect their development throughout their lifespan. This course helped me understand why different things affected people in certain ways and how you could tell they were affected by it. I learned that there is a large variety of evidence for the reasons in which children behave differently and the reasons why they act in those certain ways. In this class I was engaged in a community school in Midtown Jackson, a well-known low income community. The school I helped at was a charter school known as Midtown Public Charter School. The only difference in the charter school compared …show more content…
The style in which the teachers and the overall workers at the school treated and taught the students could have been described in some individuals views as too harsh or exactly the amount of conduct and structure a child needs to advance in an positive direction in school as well as in life. Research suggest that economic deprivation increases a child’s risk of emotional and behavioral problems in society (Mcleod & Nonnemaker, 2000), but my observations of the teachers and students suggested that the strong and harsh discipline of the teachers seemed to have a positive effect on the children at Midtown Public Charter School’s behavior. The majority of the students there didn’t have problems with conduct, they took their punishment without arguing. Resulting from the strict discipline exerted from the workers at the school, the students were all very well behaved and respectful, rather if they were sitting in a desk or walking to get lunch. They all collectively displayed proper …show more content…
The language at which a child hears varies according to the economic level of that family. Children of parents that are supported by welfare on average hear 13 million fewer words than children who are from professional families. The greater the affluence of the parent, the more likely they are to talk to their children with words of variety, and the greater the number and variety of words children hear, the better their performance is at an intellectual level (Feldman, 2011). When living in poverty the children are also more prone to attend inferior schools, and are at risk for poorer academic performance, which leads to a lifetime of difficulties following them until their late adulthood (Feldman, 2011). Poverty also seems to affects a child’s self-esteem mentally and

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