Reflection Of The Boy In The Striped Pajamas

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As Bill Goodykoontz says, “The Boy in the Striped Pajamas is a really good movie, a parable about innocence and loss that almost any critic could recommend without hesitation.” This movie tells the story of a family of four, a father, a mother and their two children Gretel and Bruno. The movie begins, as the family is getting ready to move to a farm for the father’s job as a Nazi commandant. Throughout the film, viewers will see the mom begin to question the real reason they moved to the farm, and they will watch Bruno begin to form a relationship with a Jew on the other side of the fence. The Boy in the Striped Pajamas allows the audience to see the Holocaust through the eyes of a child, experience unique relationships between characters and …show more content…
This heartbreaking film reminds us to never forget what happened 73 years ago. Children see the world very differently than adults do. They pick up on different things, question everything and view the world as a much better place. The Boy in the Striped Pajamas is told from Bruno’s point of view. This enhances the movie greatly because the audience will see all that is going in through the eyes of an eight-year-old boy. For example, Bruno goes exploring one day and ends up at the fence of the concentration camp. When he is there, he meets Shmuel a Jewish boy that is eight years old just like him. They begin to form a friendship from opposite sides of the fence. Bruno begins to ask Shmuel questions about the camp. He asks about the numbers the Jews are wearing and then assumes they are for some kind of game. Shmuel tries to explain to Bruno, but he doesn’t understand. Bruno also believes …show more content…
We see many situations that actually happened during the Holocaust including accurate depictions of how the Jews were treated. For example, the audience sees how degrading and condescending the Nazis talked to the Jews. We especially see this when the soldiers are yelling and beating the prisoners. They treat them as if they are not even people at all. There is a Jew that works in the house doing work for the family. His name is Pavel. The Nazis treat him horribly. In one scene the family is having dinner. Pavel is pouring the wine and his hands are shaky, so he spills the wine. Instantly the soldiers remove him from the room and brutally beat him. This is just one of many realistic situations that show the brutality of the Nazis. Each Jew is given a prisoner number on their pajamas just like Jews were given during the Holocaust. Towards the end of the movie, we also see the gas chambers, which were used to kill the Jews during the Holocaust. Another example revolves around propaganda. In one scene during the movie we see the soldiers in front of a T.V screen watching a film that appears to be about a concentration camp. The film is glamorized to make the concentration camps look fun and exciting even though they are nothing like this. In real life, this type of film would be played on T.V to assure the general public that the concentration camps were a safe and enjoyable place. The Boy

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