Reflection: Making A Guidelines For A Lesson Plan

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While creating the lesson plans for my 10-day unit, I made a template to guide me in my instruction. For the procedure section of my lesson plan, I have split each class into three different parts: theory instruction (12 minutes), assessment/activity (15 minutes), and singing (25 minutes). Theory instruction is when I am using my knowledge of student’s prior skills to expand on what they know, and teach new concepts that will link to those from before. During the assessment/activity, I make sure that the students comprehended and can apply what they learned during the first 12 minutes. During the singing portion of class, we work on learning and perfecting the repertoire for upcoming performances. This time schedule has been successful since …show more content…
The first three lessons of my unit plan thoroughly explained and assessed rhythm syllables: whole note (4 beats), half note (2 beats), quarter note (1 beat), eighth note (½ of a beat), and the rests that they are aligned with. The students were individually assessed with rhythmic sight reading exercises and composing/improvising short rhythmic phrases. For lesson four, the learning goal addressed was LG3, Students will be able to read and echo rhythms using whole notes, half notes, quarter notes, and eighth notes. The objective was for students to accurately clap and say (on rhythm syllables and words), their part in a new piece of music. This specific piece is a state-mandated competition song titled, Vive In Pace (1600s). It is composed/arranged by Orlando Gibbons and Audrey Snyder and written in Latin, for a 3-part mixed chorus. When I played a recording of it, the students all looked very uninterested. My students referred to it as, “slow, boring, and sounds weird.” I reassured them that once they learned all three parts and heard “how cool” it sounded together, they would change their …show more content…
They would take everything learned thus far and assess their ability to independently read the rhythm of an unfamiliar piece of music. I reviewed which line each voice part was located on, and had them write in what count they come in on. When I conducted their entrance cue to start speaking, less than half of them opened their mouth. I rarely have a problem with participation, so I thought maybe they didn’t know where we were in the music. I repeated my instructions, checking first to make sure that each voice part knew where their entrance was, and tried again. I got the same result. I did not know what to do. They had no intention of participating, because they did not like or want to sing the song. I had to quickly think of a way to grab their attention with this song and make it fun to learn. After observation and full-time teaching these students for 7 full weeks, I have learned that they are very worried about self-image and looking cool to others. This new foreign composition is not, “cool,” enough for them, and they have, “never heard anything like it.” They like being able to take old and familiar concepts and use them to learn new

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