Redl And Wattenburg: The Role Of Group Dynamics In Students

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My beliefs start Redl and Wattenburg and their methods on groups vs individuals. First, I agree that groups behave differently than individuals. I agree with their method of Diagnostic thinking when dealing with group dynamics. The process included (1) supporting the first hunch, (2) gathering facts, (3) exploring hidden factors (background information about students), (4) taking action, and (5) remaining flexible. Supporting the first hunch means when a problem first becomes apparent, teachers should form a preliminary hunch about its underlying cause. Gathering facts means that a teacher should quickly review obvious facts: Are students inattentive? Is someone breaking a rule? Are students arguing angrily?. Before a teacher 's need to take …show more content…
By considering feeling more suitable resolutions can usually be found. They go on to discuss how Teachers need to (1) supporting student self-control (2) offering situation assistance, (3) appraising reality, and (4) invoking the pleasure-pain principle (aka reward and punishment). With SSS teachers and able to address emerging problems before they become serious. When students have difficulty regaining self-control, teachers can provide situational assistance by helping students over a hurdle, restructuring the time schedule, establishing new routines, removing seductive objects, and occasionally removing a student from the situation. The apprising reality is an influence technique that helps students understand the underlying causes of their misbehavior and understand the consequences if they continue. Invoking the pleasure-pain principle is an influence technique that entails rewarding good behavior and punishing bad behavior. Punishment should only be used only as a last resort because it is frequently counterproductive. The go on to see how both teachers and students have different roles in the …show more content…
Eshpally with the student who we may consider to behaviorally at risk. Behaviorally at-risk refers to students whose behavior prevents learning and puts them in serious danger of failing school. Curwin and Mendler state that these are a student who is Failing does not respond to punishments and/or consequences from the school. Have to Low self-concepts in relation to school. Mine have little or no hope of finding success in school. Associate with and are reinforced by similar students. Behaviorally at-risk students are usually unable to maintain dignity through academic achievement, so they withdraw and act like they don’t care as a way to protect themselves. Punishments are given to these students often take them out of situations where they may learn responsibility, which is like telling a struggling batter he cannot participate in batting practice until he improves. In order to truly help this student we as a teacher need to rebuild their sense of dignity and hope at school. Students can be helped to regain hope and, further, that as they do so their behavior will improve. This can be accomplished by making learning much more interesting and worthwhile. Select for your lessons as many topics as you can that have personal importance and relevance to the students. Set up authentic learning goals that lead to genuine competencies that students can display and be proud of. This different

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