Recollection In Mark Twain's Read With Your Ear?

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Interlude: Read with your Ears In this chapter, Foster points out the mistake of reading with “our” eyes. Instead, the use of the “inner ear” benefits strongly configuring the thought process and the significance of using past recollection. The “inner ear” that Foster mention involve sorting information from specific words or phrases to bringing readers to a particular past knowledge: “whether...information comes from print or film...simply read [from] the text” (217). The “inner ear” Foster is referring to is the implement of intertextuality which include “The Law of Universal Connectedness: Every novel grows out of other novels” (218). In another word, writers and readers are influence by one another either by another book, movie, or …show more content…
Like all writers, the combination of works are gathered into one masterpiece, “it’s just the same” (198). Most importantly, great novels come from personal experience or a particular source that influence individuals to borrow other contributions: “Novelists borrow from other narrative” (204). After accomplishing personal experience, writers are able to surpass first stage as “writing grows out of experience” (211). Mark Twain and a few others, however, successfully observe the “flaw” in society. With that being said, the most important element of being a great contributor to literature is being a passionate observer to spot how falsely and comical society actually is. Foster’s Law of Novel Paradox expresses the use of influence deeply from other works and personal experiences like autobiography or diary. “Novels grow out of intensely private obsession,” (212) which allow readers to be inspire and incorporate old works into the same category of writing. Although writers are different from the rest, their works all come from the same source of idea. No matter the surrealism or the same works of others, novels are “both counterfeit and authentic” …show more content…
Good novelist comprise of “plot, character, language, [and] narrative” (242). The Law of Fictional Ideation states that no matter how good of a writer is, or “lousy,” good philosophy “doesn 't make any difference” (242). The world of literature is not all based on how experienced a writer is, but how the writer is able to deeply and successfully communicate the ideas through their readers. In 1984, Orwell uses “big idea” in his novel to elaborate on totalitarianism versus freedom, but readers enthuse over how he deliver his small idea. Winston being the protagonist, struggling for freedom, which changes Winston’s emotion toward freedom. Therefore, Orwell’s 1984 most likely is consider as a big idea of literature, which involve the movement of society. Novelists tend to focus on the big picture (big idea), which catches readers’ demands. As for readers, they question “what does it mean to be human” How can we conduct our lives to best effect” (249)? Overall, Foster’s Law of Fictional Ideation states that big idea and small idea balance out, in which “it is the perfect medium for capturing individual existence” (248) and “capturing the experience of the group”

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