Mikhail Bakhtin Dialogism

Interlude: Read with your Ears In this chapter, Foster points out the mistake of reading with “our” eyes. Instead, the use of the “inner ear” benefits strongly configuring the thought process and the significance of using past recollection. The “inner ear” that Foster mention involve sorting information from specific words or phrases to bringing readers to a particular past knowledge: “whether...information comes from print or film...simply read [from] the text” (217). The “inner ear” Foster is referring to is the implement of intertextuality which include “The Law of Universal Connectedness: Every novel grows out of other novels” (218). In another word, writers and readers are influence by one another either by another book, movie, or …show more content…
Foster reference Mikhail Bakhtin, the great Russian writer who endorsed the term dialogism, which he promptly uses to convey his thought process and his works. Dialogism is a concept where dialogues may mirror other works: “how texts speak back and forth to each other” (221). “Dialogism” or “dialogic” incorporate the the idea of “the capacity of novels to carry on an ongoing conversation” (221). Dialogic, second of Bakhtin’s term, carries out the “conversation among texts across time” (221). Dialogism employ “echoes” of “newer and older novels,” (222). This affect the structure which comprise of using works from other works and knowledge. Foster also states that using our ears are another way of finding “hints” (225) from the author. The main priority of the “inner ear” is to detect connections between works of …show more content…
In this chapter, Foster constantly remind readers that “novels aren’t about heroes. They’re about us” (232). Authors write novels to reflect how readers react to society. This is why writers create young and pure, characters; so characters can reflect specifically to readers. This is also why young kids (teens) are introduced to books where young characters mature and override obstacles at the end of the plot. In To Kill a Mockingbird, Harper Lee contribute the young protagonist, Scout Finch as looking through the “looking-glass” (230). Lee instigates Scout’s innocence as being pure, but eventually learning the dark truth of her society and family heritage. Like looking through the “looking-glass,” but not physically going to a new world, she changes over time and eventually learning how racism contributes a significant factor in her adolescent. Scout’s innocence acts as a barrier, she is opaque to the real world. “[Scout] want to play with Walter, Aunty, why can’t I?” She took off her glasses and stared at me…‘Because- he – is – trash..,” (228) this explains how Scout is lost and confused. Whereas, the end of the plot confiscates Scout’s innocence completely, but she did accomplish finding the real truth about her society. In a way, she matures as she goes on the journey to finding her identity: “Atticus says cheatin ' a colored man is ten times worse than cheatin ' a white man” (205). To Kill a

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