Recognition, Dicognition And Phonological Theory Of Dyslexia

Good Essays
Word recognition, decoding, and spelling, which are central to fluency, are the primary areas of difficulty associated with developmental dyslexia. Neurodevelopmental and familial in origin, dyslexia is a developmental language disorder with characteristic phonological difficulties that greatly impact a child’s ability to become literate, even with optimal schooling and typical intellectual functioning (Pennala, et al,. 2013). Dyslexia is a lifelong language disorder with varying severity across individuals, but is primarily a concern for children as they acquire fluency in reading, writing, and comprehension skills, and ultimately strive towards becoming literate. As described by Sahari and Johari (2012) “a child with dyslexia typically …show more content…
This theory attributes the inability to manipulate and attend to sounds as a direct result of poor representation, storage, and retrieval of speech sounds (Aravena, et al., 2013). Considering that phonological awareness is the prerequisite for becoming literate, children with dyslexia have a harder time gaining reading and spelling skills (Aravena, et al., 2013). In a 2013 study about the impacts of a child’s phonemic length discrimination ability on reading and spelling skills, phonological awareness was determined as one of the primary difficulties associated with dyslexia (Pennala, et al., 2013). The study showed that due to a child with dyslexia’s inability to isolate, blend, and/or manipulate sounds, learning to read can be hindered (Pennala, et al., …show more content…
In a 2013 study, Snowling focuses on early diagnosis and intervention for children with dyslexia. Most commonly, intervention first targets the areas of individual letter sounds and phoneme awareness, and with progress, will be incorporated together through reading and writing at the appropriate level (Snowling, 2013). Using methods of intervention that are specific to the child’s interests and literacy needs will produce the best results. For example, Sahari and Johari describe children with dyslexia as being hands-on, visual learners (2013). In this case, using clay to physically mold individual letters that will be turned into words, can help the child to actually “see” the letters and help facilitate understanding (Sahari & Johari, 2013). In addition, using different colors for words and/or letters, makes reading and writing more visually stimulating for dyslexic children. Most importantly, providing a proper classroom environment/teaching style to facilitate individualized learning is beneficial for literacy development in a child with dyslexia. For example, a teacher must introduce new vocabulary words, incorporate visuals and music into lesson plans, and use intonation in his/her voice to keep the child’s attention (Sahari & Johari, 2013). After intervention methods are put into place, a child’s progress

Related Documents

  • Decent Essays

    Oral Language

    • 1044 Words
    • 5 Pages

    The ability to see the relationship between sounds and the letters that represent them (graphemes) is at the core of reading an alphabetic language. The main objective of phonics instruction is to help children quickly establish the sounds in unfamiliar written words. When children stumble new words in texts they use the strategies of phonics to decode and understand. A knowledge of the relationships between letters and sounds is vital for decoding words which, in turn, is critical for reading. The most successful method of teaching phonics is synthetic phonics.…

    • 1044 Words
    • 5 Pages
    Decent Essays
  • Decent Essays

    The second strategy that can be used in the classroom is graphic and semantic organizers. In order for Mr. Jones student to improve her ability to comprehend and accurately respond to implicit questions, she must know how to construct images that represent the content. These organizers illustrate concepts and interrelationships among concepts of text, using pictorial devices (Armbruster& Osborn, 2003). Mr. Jones can improve the memory of the readers in his classroom when using these tools because it allows the students to represent visually the meaning and relationship of the ideas of what they…

    • 769 Words
    • 4 Pages
    Decent Essays
  • Decent Essays

    However, phonics is still an extremely important component when teaching literacy, as it encourages children to actively construct one’s own knowledge and understanding of the English language. Even though the English language is so irregular with having different spelling for the same sounds, different meanings and origins of words, the English language is fundamentally an alphabetic code (Moats, 2005). Phonics instruction provide students with a base to begin reading, spelling and writing in English. Tompkins et al. (2015) describes phonics as a “relationship between phonology and…

    • 1611 Words
    • 7 Pages
    Decent Essays
  • Decent Essays

    What Is Dyslexia?

    • 836 Words
    • 4 Pages

    Dyslexia What is dyslexia? Children with dyslexia have difficulty deciphering, reading, and understanding reading information; these in turn cause them to have difficulty with reading and writing tasks. (Cordón, 2005; Sternberg, 2009). Dyslexia is a learning disability (LD). It is characterized by a considerable difference between an individual’s general intelligence and his/her language skills, typically affecting academically performance, (Slap, 2001).…

    • 836 Words
    • 4 Pages
    Decent Essays
  • Decent Essays

    Through engagement in a particular language setting, children’s speech gradually begins to mirror that used by the people who surround him or her (Fellowes & Oakley, 2014). Therefore, each child will learn differently and although there is a common path, it will not always be identical for each child. It is important for the language development of a child, that spoken language, gestures and body language are used frequently. Fellowes & Oakley (2014) offers that according to social interactionists, the support provided by carers in language is essential to children 's learning. Mostly, carers use language more complex than children could produce on their own, speak in a different tone and emphasize certain words, in so doing they provide good language models, helping the child to expand on the language they already know.…

    • 1758 Words
    • 8 Pages
    Decent Essays
  • Decent Essays

    Introduction Before a child enters school, the child has some knowledge of language and how words work. Children are innately curious and teachers in early childhood programs need to foster children’s early literary through research based, developmentally appropriate literacy activities that fosters the essential skills that students need in order to build the foundation for learning to read. A huge component of this type of instruction is phonological awareness, which is an umbrella terms that encompasses word in sentences, syllables, onset-rime, alliteration, and phonemic awareness. Phonemic awareness is isolating the phoneme (smallest unit of sound) in words. These skills are crucial to a child’s early reading success (Roskos, 2003).…

    • 1207 Words
    • 5 Pages
    Decent Essays
  • Decent Essays

    The Orton Gillingham approach takes into account the visual, kinesthetic, tactile and auditory approaches when learning words. Students are able to move around words, arrange and listen to the sounds of words as they receive direct instruction from the teacher. In addition, one strategy that I would use in my classroom is the idea of finger spelling. This is a strategic approach towards helping students think about the sounds of each word. As students make progress in the program, they are introduced to higher level words and challenged…

    • 745 Words
    • 3 Pages
    Decent Essays
  • Decent Essays

    Essay On Dyslexia

    • 868 Words
    • 4 Pages

    Learning a Foreign Language “Dyslexia” is the most recognizable term in the field of learning disabilities. Typically, it is associated with a child’s lack of ability to read. There is much interest in figuring out how to “treat” Dyslexia through specific practice of techniques for developing and improving the reading skills of children. A very common misconception with the term “Dyslexia” is that the parents and other relatives of these children, who have this, think it’s a cause for the child’s difficulty learning to read. Therefore, they are misinformed of the actual meaning of the term.…

    • 868 Words
    • 4 Pages
    Decent Essays
  • Decent Essays

    Early Literacy Experiences

    • 1581 Words
    • 7 Pages

    Introduction Early literacy experiences are crucial to a young child’s literacy and language development (Brown, 2014). Children who are given the opportunity to develop the foundational skills in language and literacy in preschool, are better prepared to learn to read and write in kindergarten, and enjoy more academic success later in life (Brown, 2014). When given the opportunity to engage in purposeful and meaningful language, children can develop a strong literacy and reading development foundation (Brown, 2014). The development of language, literacy, and reading require several foundational skills which become more proficient and complex as skills are mastered (Brown, 2014). Educators must be knowledgeable of the developmental process…

    • 1581 Words
    • 7 Pages
    Decent Essays
  • Decent Essays

    Opportunities such as acting, telling news and games are a few options of opportunities for children to develop their oral language (Fellowes & Oakley, 2014, p. 32). In addition, O’Donnell et al. (2016, p. 128) explain how equally important social interaction is for the development of oral language. Teachers should also provide students opportunities to interact socially and allow students to generate language themselves. In the classroom, a teacher can facilitate…

    • 1860 Words
    • 8 Pages
    Decent Essays