Recognition, Dicognition And Phonological Theory Of Dyslexia

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Word recognition, decoding, and spelling, which are central to fluency, are the primary areas of difficulty associated with developmental dyslexia. Neurodevelopmental and familial in origin, dyslexia is a developmental language disorder with characteristic phonological difficulties that greatly impact a child’s ability to become literate, even with optimal schooling and typical intellectual functioning (Pennala, et al,. 2013). Dyslexia is a lifelong language disorder with varying severity across individuals, but is primarily a concern for children as they acquire fluency in reading, writing, and comprehension skills, and ultimately strive towards becoming literate. As described by Sahari and Johari (2012) “a child with dyslexia typically …show more content…
This theory attributes the inability to manipulate and attend to sounds as a direct result of poor representation, storage, and retrieval of speech sounds (Aravena, et al., 2013). Considering that phonological awareness is the prerequisite for becoming literate, children with dyslexia have a harder time gaining reading and spelling skills (Aravena, et al., 2013). In a 2013 study about the impacts of a child’s phonemic length discrimination ability on reading and spelling skills, phonological awareness was determined as one of the primary difficulties associated with dyslexia (Pennala, et al., 2013). The study showed that due to a child with dyslexia’s inability to isolate, blend, and/or manipulate sounds, learning to read can be hindered (Pennala, et al., …show more content…
In a 2013 study, Snowling focuses on early diagnosis and intervention for children with dyslexia. Most commonly, intervention first targets the areas of individual letter sounds and phoneme awareness, and with progress, will be incorporated together through reading and writing at the appropriate level (Snowling, 2013). Using methods of intervention that are specific to the child’s interests and literacy needs will produce the best results. For example, Sahari and Johari describe children with dyslexia as being hands-on, visual learners (2013). In this case, using clay to physically mold individual letters that will be turned into words, can help the child to actually “see” the letters and help facilitate understanding (Sahari & Johari, 2013). In addition, using different colors for words and/or letters, makes reading and writing more visually stimulating for dyslexic children. Most importantly, providing a proper classroom environment/teaching style to facilitate individualized learning is beneficial for literacy development in a child with dyslexia. For example, a teacher must introduce new vocabulary words, incorporate visuals and music into lesson plans, and use intonation in his/her voice to keep the child’s attention (Sahari & Johari, 2013). After intervention methods are put into place, a child’s progress

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