Hidden Horrors: Japanese War Crimes

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Japanese. These women because they can look back and reflect on their experiences, serve as historical reference to some of the atrocities committed by the Japanese during World War II. Through this new evidence, historians can create new perspectives on a historical period in time. This theme of harsh treatment at the hands of the Japanese is also prevalent in Toshiyuki Tanaka work Hidden horrors: Japanese War Crimes in World War II. This book describes the acts of cannibalism towards Australian, Pakistanis, Indians, and even fellow comrade during World War II by a group of Japanese. This work also describes the horrid fate endured by sixty-five ship wrecked Australian nurses and British soldiers who were both shot and stabbed to death by …show more content…
Although there is much evidence tom illustrate Japanese harsh treatment there is also evidence to prove otherwise. What evidence to reference and how to portray this treatment will be up to the historian. Author Robin Paul Whittick Havers work Reassessing the Japanese Prisoner of War Experience: The Changi Prisoner of War Camp in Singapore is a prime example of how historians may focus on more positive aspects of prisoner of war treatment in order to portray the treatment of the Japanese in a more positive fashion. In his work author Havers states, “At Changi it is obvious that the Japanese behaved comparatively decently towards the POWs.” He argues that the popular perception of life in Japanese prisoner of war camps are often dominated by images of emaciated figures, engaged in slave labor, and badly treated by their captors. By focusing on a particular Japanese prisoner of war camp and the experiences of the internees, author Havers illustrates that although there may have in fact been areas that the Japanese engaged in harsh treatment of its prisoners, Camps such as Changi afforded their captives a high degree of autonomy that resulted in a prison camp society that grew and flourished in contrast to other …show more content…
This subject has illustrated that with so many works written regarding there are several ways of portraying this treatment. However, many historians will agree that these occurrences did in fact take place and there are similar and contesting themes in the treatment in all these areas where prisoners of wars were taken and occupational forces were present. When analyzing this theme of occupational force treatment of civilians and prisoner of war treatment, from a historical perspective, one can begin to draw many similarities and differences when comparing American, German, and Japanese treatment of its prisoners. For example, as several of these sources have illustrated, in America, thousands of European and Japanese prisoners were taken as a result of being captured in as a result of an act of war. This also occurred in Europe under the Third Reich and in Japan. However, in America, similar to Europe, took thousands of those of Japanese heritage were taken because of their ethnic origin. As a result they were subject to the treatment of a criminal and lost not only their freedom, but years of theirs lives. This would also occur in Europe where thousands of those of Jewish heritage and other groups deemed not worthy in the eyes of the Nazis were confined to the

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