Cause Of The Falklands War Essay

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Argentina was, to a large extent, mostly to blame for the start of the Falklands war.
Argentina initiated attacks on the British controlled Falklands islands that caused tension to build up between the two sides. They did this in the hope that England would back down and enter into negotiations with them. This failed, the pressure that Argentina created built up and instead England responded with attacks using the navy, the two sides consequently ended up in a full-scale war. Therefore to a large extent, the actions carried out by Argentina are therefore seen as the main cause for the start if the war. However Argentina were not the only cause, a common misunderstanding between the two sides leads to an unnecessary war, this may also be considered
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A common misunderstanding between the two sides was a factor in the start of the war. After making an initial advance and requesting to enter into negotiations with the British, they had not received an answer in months. The British, once they had heard word of the advance, knew they had a formidable task on their hands. Plans of a response had taken place. Because of the delay, Argentina took a more aggressive stance. This misunderstanding played a part in the start of the war; therefore Argentina cannot be blamed completely for the start of the war. Englands unwillingness to negotiate upon Argentina’s first response can also be seen as a major factor contributing to the fact that both sides can be blamed. This mutual misunderstanding can be seen as a lesser factor in the start of the …show more content…
England felt entitled to respond violently. Therefore, to a large extent, Argentina was to blame for the start of the war. Argentina sought after a sense of nationalism from their population and that is exactly what they got in the short term, and exactly what got them into the Falklands war. Argentina had made an initial advance into the Islands, waiting for England to respond. However once England had responded, due to the massive support from their people, they had no choice but to go ahead with a full-scale war. The misunderstanding between the two sides therefore takes a back seat in terms of taking the blame for the start of the war. It was the “Juntas’” own wrongdoing and false support from the people that lead to the advances to war after the initial invasion. Therefore Argentina was, to a large extent, mostly to blame for the start of the

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