Reasons Between Joining Or Not Joining The League Of Nations

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America is known for being a country of freedom and opportunity. So when the question of joining or not joining the League of Nations was brought upon the American government, many saw it as keeping or losing the power to decide what the United States intervenes in. The argument about joining or not joining the League of Nations, came down to personal vendettas and small details.
The idea of a council of leaders, from different countries is a good idea when executed correctly.. Wilson tries to rally the people to his cause in hope of swaying the government’s opinion on the matter. Wilson wanted to create the League of Nations, in hope that participating countries could solve problems peacefully. But because of the variety of backgrounds
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Lodge disagreed with Wilson and The League of Nations. He believed that joining the League of Nations would limit the power that the United States government had, in deciding what it should or should not intervene in.
Senator Lodge was most likely also upset that Wilson had not brought one Republican with him to Europe. Lodge felt like the Republicans had been left out of a major discussion. If Wilson had brought a few Republicans with him to Europe, he could have convinced the United States to join the League of Nations. Yet because of his foolish decision Lodge continue to gain support against joining the League of Nations. Most Americans, after seeing the affects of WWI, did not want to get sucked into European conflict. Especially considering that the had minimal American interest in
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When and where should the United States intervene? Should the U.S have treaties? The reason the United States was so baffled by these questions, is because they had a certain set of values that they believed that they should lead by example. But they did not know how to lead by example without upsetting a major ethnic group. If Germany was not punished harshly, the Americans with a strong sense of nationalism would be mad; however if Germany was punished harshly, the German-Americans would be upset. So the United States had to find that balance to attempt to please their wide variety of people.
The League of Nations and Treaty of Versailles was a good attempt at stopping another “Great War” from happening. But it left the participating countries vulnerable to another world war from happening. Because of all the treaties involved. If a member of the League of Nations declared war on another country, all of the other members, would be brought into the war as well. This would just start another deadly and costly war. So not ratifying the Treaty of Versailles saved thousands of lives and millions of dollars in

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