Reality And Reality In Plato's Theory Of Allegory Of Cave

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Having studied the first part “what is real”, I reconsidered the seemingly real world that I originally took for granted. And it followed that several questions came over my mind. Firstly of all, what is the measurement of the degree to which something is real? Or in other words, how can we prove that something we perceive is real? Secondly, in the process of seeking truth, can reason really be separated from empirical experience? Or can human separate themselves from the empirical world? Ultimately, is seeking reality or reality indeed possible? Within the three texts of the first part, the first text and the third part guided me to reflect on the questions proposed above most, while the second one might not be that influential to me. To explain …show more content…
From Plato’s perspective, trapped in his body, one’s soul was deceived by the world that he directly perceived, and only through the pure exercise of reason or philosophical thinking could one authentically reach the very truth of the world-the world of form where everything is objective, perfect, eternal and independent. The sensible world is just an imperfect replica of the world of form constructed by the divine craftsman (the Demiurge). Therefore, in Plato’s theory, the measurement of reality seems to be the extent to which something is similar to the world of form, which means that the closer a thing is to the world of form, the more real the thing is. Nevertheless, such a measurement is not convincing enough to me and thus raise my further thinking. The world of form, a perfect and eternal world is actually predicted by Plato rather than proved by him. With philosophical thinking, he used a logic of idealization to speculate the existence or objectivity of the world of form. Then he justified his speculation by separating soul from body, or reason from sensible world, saying that only when one turned the direction of his soul can one really perceive the world of form. From my perspective, he seemed to construct a theory similar to …show more content…
Is seeking truth or truth itself really possible for us? As we can only testify one thing’s authenticity by another thing in the empirical, in fact we can never escape from our subjective world. It seems like a generalized case of Plato’s allegory of cave, which denies the possibility of reason or philosophical thinking’s helping us to achieve truth, since reason itself seems to rely on shadow cast on the wall. The world may only be a subjective world. The objective world, though is logically supposed to exist, has already been distorted by human body and mind. Science and reason seem to stop at the boundary of empirical world, outside which human resort to imagination or some transcendental factor like religion

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