Realism In The Avant Garde

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Realism was not always a keyword in the agenda of the Avant-Garde. From the end of the 1910s, dramatic changes of political landscape took place in the European Continent: the Wiemar Republic was formed; the Soviet Communist Party grasped the power in Russia; Italian Fascism and German Nazism strengthened their dominance. Some artists kowtowed to the autocratic regimes while others redirected their attention to the evolving political philosophy and the newly created discipline of psychoanalysis. Different schools of artists define the meanings and underpinning functions of realism differently: the Bauhaus utilized realism as a vehicle to accomplish functionality; Surrealism thought that realism should contrast the unconscious side of human …show more content…
Under a relatively free political environment, the Bauhaus collaboration adventured in the domain that focused on the functionality and realism. The “Wassily Chair” designed by Breuer exhibits simplicity while comfort. It utilizes the cheap and normal mental as material and has a straightforward combination of color--black and silver. The chair is not an abstract work of “art” but a realistic product for commerce. Comparably, “Haus am Horn” by Muche masterfully arranges the living spaces humanely and efficiently. The children bedroom could be monitored from the kitchen and the dining hall, ensuring the parents to take care of the children while working. Realism in Bauhaus surpassed the potential abstraction in the simple form the artists chose. Wingler states that the Bauhaus possesses a dream to reestablish a lifestyle based upon efficiency, order and ideal functions. Realism propels the Bauhaus artists to thrive in the post-WWI chaos. (Wingler, …show more content…
The movement was at a peak when painters such as Brodsky and Gaponenko were sponsored by the party in the 1930s. Both artists took extremely realist depiction of the themes and subjects. In Brodsky’s Lenin at the Smolny Institute, the former paramount of USSR Vladimir Lenin sit on an armchair reading. Interior colors, furniture and Lenin’s dressing are as real as possible. Lenin was drawn as an intellectual who led the great revolution with wisdom and conviction. Similarly, Gaponenko’s To Mother for the Next Feed displays a harmonious Communist society and human interpersonal relationships. The station at the back represents Soviet daycare system, a pinnacle of the country’s investment in welfare. The facial expressions of the figures are clearly seen as happy and optimistic. In reality, the USSR was ruined by the WWI and the infrastructure significantly destroyed. The public was starving and could not sustain subsistence. Artistic reality was advocated by the regime to create a fantasy of worldly reality. This reality is condemned by Greenberg as being a type of Kitsch, which was an instrument appropriated by the political entity to combat with a worrying reality. Using artistic reality to serve political purpose and generate an image of an ideal society and beautiful vision of the ruling party is prevalent in the politically turbulent

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