Raymond Hains And Christo's Definition Of French Art

1464 Words 6 Pages
In the late 1960s‘, after the end of the Second World War, Paris was not any more the romantic city, known from the last centuries. The French capital became the described definition of 'modern ' in the same sense of an international culture. This meaning was adapted by other folklores as African sculptures, American detective stories, Russian music, Neo-Catholicism, German technique, Italian desperation. Meantime a group called Nouveaux Réalistes was formed, where two artists were working within – Raymond Hains and Christo with his wife Jeanne-Claude. By analysing their works - Panneau d’affichage (Billboard) and Wall of Barrels – The Iron Curtain, Rue Visconti, Paris, in this visual analysis I will try to compare and to distinct them therefore …show more content…
On the 27th October 1960 in Paris Pierre Restany formed a group with his colleagues Yves Klein, Arman, François Dufrêne, Raymond Hains, Daniel Spoerri, Martial Raysse, Jean Tinguely, and Jacques Villeglé, under the name Nouveaux Réalistes. The ideas that they have shared about the “gap between art and life” were by handling with modern consumption and mass media to create ‘reality’, where artists worked with different forms from Action-spectacles, Happenings, décollages, Assemblage, and wrappings. The Nouveaux Réalistes simply rehearsed the avant-garde forms in an institutional context that the Dadaists set out to …show more content…
With his co-worker Jacques Villeglé, they began to create the so-called affiches lacérées or torn posters. Hains was mainly working with the technique décollages and he left the lacered posters untouched. The complicated layering of fragmentary pictures and content in the work of these affichestes has come to seem increasingly perceptive of the information overloaded as we go into the new century. The artist used this form of an art as a medium, which able to perform sociological resonance as in his exhibition La France Déchirée (Paris, Gal. J, 1961). That exhibition included posters reflecting the French reaction to the Algerian war, war which continued to 1962. Hains considered himself as “inaction painter” where he collected posters which he lacerates the trace of a particular cause – the act of tearing- and that cause is the object to which the tears refer. In the end, the lacerated work remains ‘anonymous’ through the artists’ abandonment of the painterly-expressive and collage-constructive

Related Documents