Ramon Gutiervez's Chicano Struggles For Racial Justice

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Collective action has been incorporated into many societies as a result of the inequalities that these communities have been suffering from. These groups of people unite, take motivation from their culture, and create a movement that aims to enhance the interests of their community. Authors that have discussed the idea of collective action and culture have distinct arguments that produce both strengths and weaknesses. In “Chicano Struggles for Racial Justice: the Movement’s Contribution to Social Theory”, the author, Ramon Gutierrez claims that collective action of both Chicanos and African Americans contributed to the study of social theory, including the internal colonialism theory. Such theory centers itself on the dominance that the United …show more content…
According to Gutierrez, the civil rights movement produced the upward mobility of middle and high class Mexican and African Americans; however, the barrios and ghettos did not really change regardless of the ideas that arose from the internal colonialism theory (Gutierrez 110). This claim is a weakness in Gutierrez’s argument because it underestimates the effects of the social movement. Gutierrez believes that this unification did not create much change among the barrios and ghettos; however, regardless of physical change, the movement created social change. It sanctioned for the change of ideals and beliefs that prohibited Chicano/a’s from progressing. Even though this social movement did not produce a plethora of actual changes in many communities, it brought together a culture and educated them on social and political issues. Chicano/a culture …show more content…
Taft defines youth engagements as “...those activities in which children and youth enact a public-spirited commitment in pursuit of the common good” (Taft 18). Youth engagement is a form of collective action in which the members of this engagement are pursuing the same goals. Taft also examines how culture affects youth engagement in political and social affairs. Taft claims that teachers who teach curriculum dealing with immigration and help expand the students’ abilities to persuade and argue are allowing these children to become capable of engaging in civil and leadership movements (Taft 20). Teachers who incorporate teachings about immigration into their curriculum are utilizing culture as a tool to influence students’ motives and ideals. Those teachers who oppose or do not believe in the ability of students’ participating, are hindering their ability to undertake in youth engagement (Taft 21). Many teachers underestimate the abilities of their students because of their age; however, by doing so, teachers are forcing their students’ to repress their desire for change. This claim is a major strength in Taft’s argument because it demonstrates how youth participation in social and political issues is often disregarded or not allowed because of the participants age. Taft is exhibiting how young age is often a

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