Racism And Discrimination In The Media

1121 Words 4 Pages
Stereotypes. Racism. Discrimination. These three controversial topics make up a metaphoric holy trinity that is a huge focus point in the media of the United States today. Black on black crimes, white on black crimes, vice versa, and terrorist stereotypes are just a few examples of the stories in the news that persuade the perspectives of American viewers. Prejudice, stereotypes, and discrimination always negatively affect individuals but never truly benefits the evoker. Americans are getting too comfortable with racism and think that it is alright. Discrimination is portrayed in today’s media and specifically targets minorities such as blacks, Arabs, and women. These “minorities,” however, are turning into a majority factor driving society …show more content…
Godsil goes on to explain how “Deaths of black men and boys at the hands of police, combined with grand juries’ failure to indict, have spurred grief, rage and protest across the country.” The people of America are fed up with the continuation of old habits in which the country was built upon i.e. slavery. Recent “black lives matter” riots and protests have been taking the world by storm. People get confused, however, when associating “black lives matter” with reverse racism. Being “pro black” does not necessarily mean you are “anti-white.” The movement is to enforce equality and brings the struggles of blacks to light. These informative protests and social media accounts that exploit societies weak points should become more popular because it brings everyone to reality. Racism does not only apply towards blacks/African-Americans but Caucasian, Hispanic, Asian, and middle eastern people …show more content…
“Based on extensive research with black and white mothers of diverse socioeconomic backgrounds in Britain, Duncan and Edwards propose three ideal types of gendered moral rationalities to explain differences in mother’s employment and childcare decisions: the ‘primary mother,’ the ‘primary worker,’ and the ‘mother/worker integral.’” In most cases there seemed to be a reassurance where women said “‘Being a mother and a worker are distinct and inherently conflicting roles. My role is to be a mother’” and others say that “‘Being a mother and being a worker are distinct but compatible roles. Each is an important part of who I am.’” (Duncan and Edwards 1999) In all situations, however, the individuals are put in difficult positions in where they have to struggle balancing the household and their

Related Documents