Racism In To Kill A Mockingbird

1358 Words 6 Pages
Register to read the introduction… Boo doesn’t really leave his house but he does still try to talk to some of the people in the town. He starts putting gifts in the tree by his house for Jem and Scout to show how nice he really is he once fix Jem’s pants for him to show his kindness (Lee). Boo was a very heroic man and didn’t whatever he could to help once when Miss Maudie’s house caught on fire and Scout was watching it Boo snuck over and put a blanket around her. When Boo save’s the kids Scout changed her mind about him and tried to get to know the real person that sacrifices his self and not judge him (Felty).
Scout is very curious about things and asks her father Atticus many questions to know about the real things in life (Lee). Scout was always curious about Boo Radley and asked Miss Maudie and many questions about him and she wondered was Boo still alive (Lee). Scout heard so many bad things about Negroes such as Tom Robinson she questioned her father and asked why lawyers defended Negroes (Lee). Scout wanted to know many things and wanted to know why they occurred the way they did. Scout was young but she was very smart and knew more than people thought, she was an amazing little
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"The Case against To Kill a Mockingbird." Race & Class 45.1 (July-Sept. 2003).: 99-110. Rpt. in Contemporary Literary Criticism. Ed. Jeffrey W. Hunter. Vol. 194. Detroit: Gale, 2005. Literature Resources from Gale. Web. 14 Jan. 2014.
Shackelford, Dean. "The Female Voice in To Kill a Mockingbird: Narrative Strategies in Film and Novel." Mississippi Quarterly 50.1 (Winter 1996).: 101-113. Rpt. in Contemporary Literary Criticism. Ed. Jeffrey W. Hunter. Vol. 194. Detroit: Gale, 2005. Literature Resources from Gale. Web. 14 Jan. 2014.
Smykowski, Adam. "Symbolism and Racism in To Kill a Mockingbird." Readings on "To Kill a Mockingbird". Ed. Terry O'Neill. San Diego, Calif.: Greenhaven Press, 2000. 52-56. Rpt. in Contemporary Literary Criticism. Ed. Jeffrey W. Hunter. Vol. 194. Detroit: Gale, 2005. Literature Resources from Gale. Web. 14 Jan. 2014.
Watson, Rachel. "The view from the porch: race and the limits of empathy in the film To Kill a Mockingbird." The Mississippi Quarterly 63.3-4 (2010).: 419+. Literature Resources from Gale. Web. 14 Jan. 2014.
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