Racism In The Movie Pinky

712 Words 3 Pages
With racial inequality being brought up to the public regarding Afro-Americans ' contribution in WWII, it was more reflected on medias. Filming industry approached to it by implying more racial conducts in movies like Pinky(1949), where racial stereotype was openly discussed and compared Afro-Americans ' treatment in the South with the North. In shorts, people are more aware of racial inequalities and can be reflected upon the movies. Cripps (1980) claimed that most stereotype merge from a popular culture that was drawn upon imaginative use of familiar 'myths ' for its audience, and 'myths ' don 't last forever. The years from 1910 to 1915, the Civil War helped shape Black images along line derived from outmoded rural Southern sources, fixing …show more content…
He approached this topic in many ways but one point I find especially is how the Negro see the problem and how the Whites justify their unjust. According to him, Negros tend to keep the problem to themselves, that they seldom walks to a white person. And the Whites justify their actions by "thinking Negros are all right in their place; and they on their past do not want things changed. In fact, they are the happiest lot on Earth" (Myrdal 1994:270). It really can be shown in the movie Pinky. When the main character was a kid, they were taught not to express their anger to the Whites, as Pinky did when her owner don 't allow her to play in the yard. The idea that the Blacks were just fine with their situations can be seen when they were discouraged, by other Blacks, to fight for their own …show more content…
Hispanic Americans, unlike other ethnic groups in America, "became the unintentional beneficiaries of international pressures on Hollywood which worked in their behalf" (Woll 1980:253). Hollywood wasn 't fair or kind to the Hispanic images that they portrayed on the screens. As suggested by Cripps, stereotypes were built upon myths, but the myths can be changed. At that time, the tension and growing threat of war with Germany, the United States was eager to ease tensions with South American governments in order to "maintain hemispheric unity as a bulwark against foreign invasion" (Woll 1980:255). But with the newly found reverence toward the Latin, Hollywood abruptly reversed the old stereotypes, of them being an ignorant peasant, to a more advanced and civilized society. Sadly though, Latin stereotypes have remained rooted in the American media, despite the modification in the standard stereotype, Hispanic Americans still need to live with those unflattering imageries. Marchetti (1994) focused more on feminism in films that can be associated with racial differences. In the article, she used the film Sayonara (1957) as an example to illustrate peace and racial tolerance in America. The ideology of romance within race and war called for change to the reaffirmation of male. It illustrated how "the dominant ideology deals with social and cultural changes

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