Racism In The 19th Century Essay

1070 Words 5 Pages
In our society, Natives face systematic racism on a daily basis. From early on, they were confronted to discrimination. In the 19th century, the Canadian government completely ignored their needs and mistreated them. James Daschuk provides in his writing his thesis as to why tension rose between the two ethnic groups. His writings are quite complete and convincing, but yet lack coherence. Sidney Harring presents in his writing quite different aspects and many similarities regarding the reason for the tensions between both groups to Daschuk’s writing. In our society, Natives face systematic racism on a daily basis dating from quite early on in Canadian history. In the 19th century, the Canadian government completely ignored their needs and mistreated …show more content…
In the first chapter, Daschuk focuses on the earlier years of that period and on the medical aspects. He discusses the several diseases that affected Natives during the earlier years of the treaty period and how mostly religious groups treated them. He highlights the implication of Catholic and Protestant missionaries trying to stop the diseases, such as smallpox, through different methods at risk of contracting the diseases, the Natives (Daschuk 87-88). He advances that it led to growing tension between Natives and Canadians as they openly blamed Canadian for some diseases. According to Daschuk, the aboriginals felt like “this was a white man’s disease, and they hated the whites” (Daschuk 86) The medical techniques to constraint the disease were proven not to be very effective as diseases still took many lives (Daschuk 80). In addition, the author states that aboriginals were outraged that the government sold their land to the Hudson’s Bay Company without getting their consent and without giving them any financial compensation (Daschuk 93). In the second chapter, the author examines the federal government’s action in regards of the many health issues, mainly malnutrition, tuberculosis and smallpox, within the Native community. He

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