Racism In Native Son, By Richard Wright

717 Words 3 Pages
“Was what we had heard about rich white people really true?” as said by Bigger himself best describes the novel and himself. Native Son, by Richard Wright, uses narrative story to and complex plot to bring focus to an epidemic occurring at the time. The novel’s setting is around the 1930’s in Chicago’s South Side where racism was still a raging issue. Throughout the book we follow protagonist, Bigger Thomas, as he goes through the effects of racism. The plot consists of Bigger getting a job as a chauffeur, for the rich and white family the Dalton’s daughter, Mary. Bigger accidently kills Mary. As the plot develops he will continue to murder more white women until he is detained and imprisoned by police. In his hearing at the courtroom his lawyer …show more content…
This brings upon him deep feelings of helplessness and an urge to kill himself or somebody else. Bigger has part-taken in crimes but mostly on his “own” or other black people and never towards a white family in fear that the police will look for suspects. If a man of color is found accountable for a crime it will only further jeopardize the views of racism. “If you don’t stop running with that gang of yours and do right you’ll end up where you never thought you would.” as foreshadowed by Ms. Thomas, Bigger would take a turn for the worse. After the murder of Mary Dalton, he does not feel guilty but empowered for being a black man killing a white woman of class. At that moment, Bigger becomes inhumane in his efforts to defend his ethical views on racism while contributing to the viscous cycle that contributes in discriminatory views. Despite his abnormal actions, readers can still admire his efforts on wanting to change societal views in regards to race …show more content…
Although hostility and rage between racial groups have settled enormously throughout the decades, we are only now beginning to cross the verge to peace. In modern-day society, we still have a primarily power in government and society held by white men. Yet, some may say a few years back we had a black president the Congress and Senate truly in charge of the government are primarily white. Still stereotypes among racial groups are emplaced shaping the way society views one another. Due to these inequalities, our culture is still creating Biggers’ in milder forms. It is creating black, as well as other minority races, activists who strive to attain an equilibrium between each other but struggle with the resources to do so with peace and without

Related Documents