Hip Hop Stereotypes

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In the film, Hip Hop: Beyond the Beats and Rhythm, hip hop enthusiast Byron Hart depicts various stereotypes in hip hop culture. Through various interviews and songs, he proves his views about masculinity, misogyny, and racism in hip hop. Hip hop is largely centered around the view that males are dominant in society and should not be ‘soft’ and women are materialized and come ‘a dime a dozen’. Racism plays a large role in asserting dominance and proving masculinity. Hip hop culture has a large influence on society also, as it is a large contributor to society’s problems with gender roles and racism. In the film, Hunt identifies many characteristics of the ‘real man’, as he identifies the character traits of strong, hard, tough, in control, dominant, ego driven, and sexualizing as main character traits of the real man. Hip hop defines the real man as tough and hard because it dates back to the concept of that a man has to be strong and tough to defend and support his family. A man seen as soft would usually be subject to feminizing and racially degrading insults. A real man is ego driven because most rappers are concerned with money, fame, and girls, and the biggest rappers have the largest ego. Hip hop portrays men as dominant and sexualizing over women …show more content…
In 2015, a lot of hip hop as changed and most artists are focused on being socially responsible for their younger fans and trying to change the image of hip hop in society. Due to the newer generation of rap, sexism, masculinity, and violence has become a less apparent factor in hip hop and the industry as a whole is focused on changing the perception of hip hop in today’s society. The film presented valid and factual arguments about how hip hop affects society as a whole, but in 2015, hip hop has become a more progressive

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