Racism: Home, Memory, And Future

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On October 16th, I made my way to a cultural event. The event was called “Home, Memory, and Future”, when I heard the name of it I believed it was based on the beliefs of people in other words their religions or their culture. As I read the introduction I realized it was about Harlem, which is located only a couple stops from home. Then I wondered what kind of cultural events have happened in Harlem, instantly I thought of the word diversity. In New York, there are many people that come from different backgrounds, they come to comfort themselves with what they believe. The question shouldn’t be what how many cultures are there? The question is how is it that living in a place so diverse such a Harlem; does not discomfort others from …show more content…
The people all around were very happy and children were getting their face painted, I went with my daughter she was going to get her face painted as well, but everyone was making their way to the stage where story time was going to take place; “five minutes till story time”; said the lady as I went to the front and listen to the story. The story was about an anancy spider from Ghana, that was a trickster. The man telling the story made a statement about these “special” stories being important for Caribbean culture center to retell these stories that the enslaved African had brought along with them. As the story went on Anancy the spider was a character that like to get things for nothing, in other words a free loader, he had a friend tiger that was a very nice friend the one thing that made them close was that they both love to swim. One day Anancy wanted to go to a new place he had found to swim, tiger did not believe him Anancy then said that he will cook something because he was a better cook, tiger felt offended by Anancy …show more content…
Majority of them were in black and white. The first picture I came across was the women of the Young Lords; a woman with glasses; she was looking away from the camera, it looks as if she was thinking about something. Her name was Denise Oliver; a member of the Hartford Young Lords, the picture was taken some time between 1969 – 1970. As I kept looking I also happen to come across the description of the exhibition which stated “This inaugural exhibition is the new home of the Caribbean Cultural Center African Diaspora institute, examines issue of nationality and cultural heritage in the context of change and transformation in East and west of Harlem”. As I explore each picture carefully I found very interesting how people were yet so different but not as different as we think. When you look at the pictures, you can see how people dressed, how they lived during that time period. Many photos spoke out to me, but one that I could not leave in peace was a picture of people pushing a truck and the truck was label Chest X-ray Unit, from the looks of it the truck looks like a police truck and people are pushing it as if they are trying to send a sign to the police, that they are looking for justice. The picture moved me because of the effort they put to push the truck; there was a man pushing with his pants falling off his hips. Throughout the museum, majority of the images they represented

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