Analysis: The Black Liberation Movement

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Between Women’s and Civil Rights, there are African-American women, not completely sheltered by neither movements. The feminism was perceived to be white women 's word not for Africa-American women’s word. Likewise, even after the Civil Rights Act, Black women still being sexually oppressed, now, by Black men as well. Afro-American women do not live their lives negatively impacted by sexism alone. The Women’s Movement does not reflect the most pressing needs of the majority black women and minority-ethnic women.
Understanding the connections between racism and sexism, it is understanding the meaning of multiple oppressions, prospecting a new class of minority. The result is a Black women group without legal resources, it is not part of the
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The eradication of sexism, racism and the practices theirs support, was in desperate urgency. For this purpose, the Black Feminist Liberation Movement was created.
Although, the beginning of Black feminism was not an easy accomplishment. At that time, only few Afro-Americans were willing to assume themselves as feminists. Many misconceptions about feminism were present within the society, as a consequence, the oppression towards women still high. Moreover, Black community was still facing tremendous oppression from the white community.
The Black Liberation Movement appears in the late 60’s early 70 's, groups of Afro-American feminists, part of other feminist organizations, founded the National Black Feminist Organization (NBFO) and Black Women Organized for Action (BWAO). Among to those groups, important figures such as Alice Walker and Barbara Smith, were part of their foundation. Right after, Barbara Smith joined a visionary black lesbian feminist group, the Combahee River Collective. This group would fight against all forms of intersectional oppression, gender, age, disability, sexuality and social class (Smith, "Black Feminism and
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The black movement had to create a unique organization to fulfill their needs, finding a way to spawned several forms of oppression, addressing racism, sexism and classism. Nowadays, Feminism tries to involve anti-racist speeches to its seminars, acclaiming more black women’s writings and history.
In relation to the black movement, in other hand, has not been so successful. Especially in the black popular culture, where, influenced mostly by the hip-hop music industry, continues to be extremely sexiest and anti-feminist. This is closely related to the point Beale made in her article, how in an American culture is important to a man "have a good job, make a lot of money and drive a Cadillac to be considered a real man,” (Beale, Double Jeopardy: To Be Black And Female, pg.110). The projected model of masculinity leaves an opening to the femininity.
Furthermore, it empowers the separatism of gender and their social responsibilities. Most of all, all the struggles are interconnected in terms of discrimination and sexism. The feminism its not just for women, to development of a political and societal inclusion, the participation of men in the feminism movement is essential. As much as the Black Women

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