Racism And Discrimination And Affirmative Action

1294 Words 6 Pages
Al Sharpton, probably the most established contemporary civil rights activist, once said, “How do we make things fair?” This enquiry is important today because things really aren’t fair. Although America has progressed very far when it comes to racism and discrimination, it still has a long way to go. Affirmative action policies are essentially used to combat long term racial failures and promote equality. These policies are aimed to increase the proportion of minorities and women in jobs and educational institutions historically dominated by white men. The term "affirmative action" was first introduced by President Kennedy in 1961 as a method of redressing discrimination that had persisted in spite of civil rights laws and constitutional guarantees. …show more content…
This requires that there be a clear disparity in the chance that individuals of certain races have of succeeding. In the fourth quarter of 2015, the unemployment rates among individuals of the four most represented races demonstrate a significant discrepancy. The U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics recorded: white unemployment was 4.1%; black was 8.8%; Asian was 3.8%; Hispanic was 6.2%. Ideally, the unemployment rates for every race would be zero. Since this cannot be the case, there must be measures taken to bring all races closer to the average of 4.8% unemployment. Additionally, a Forbes survey discovered that 85% of employers believe diversity is crucial for their businesses in that it allows them to gain the perspectives and ideas that foster innovation (Talent Management). This especially applies to companies that have a wide target audience and need employees who offer many different viewpoints on how to improve or expand the product. Every race should have the same opportunities in the workforce and the government needs to ensure that this holds …show more content…
By 2003, over 23% of all law enforcement officers were minorities, a significant increase from 14% in 1987 (Enhancing Police Integrity). The public tend to have more faith in and more positive experiences with the police when the officers of the force exhibit a more diverse pool of applicants because a diverse force is acknowledged to be more sensitive to the cultures and traditions of minority ethnic groups (what-when-how). Additionally, diversity helps police departments become more responsive to community needs and allows them to undertake specific initiatives such as the use of liaison officers with specific communities. Where diverse law enforcement agencies are able to put such practices and relationships to good use, tensions decline and minority relationships with the police improve leading to a more law abiding, fair

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