Racial Segregation In South Africa

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Segregation was in South Africa even before apartheid became a law. Racial segregation was always a problem in South Africa after their colonization. South Africa was colonized by the English and the Dutch in the 1800s. Racial segregation was used by the justice system to suppress Black South Africans to maintain white dominance. Black South Africans were given harsh punishment for petite crimes that they committed. The justice system was in place to protect white South African at all means. Then came the apartheid law which was a law that was formally enforcing the separation of Black and White South Africans. Black South Africans were now even more limited in many aspects in their land. They now had restrictions for living, and …show more content…
Nelson Mandela was born of a royal family of the Thembu tribe of South Africa on July 18, 1918. He was born into a large family, which consisted of many siblings conceived by his father’s other wives. His father was a chief in the village of Muezo South Africa. Due to his family, financial instability, he was adopted by one of the leaders in his tribe Mr. Jongintabi Dalindyebo; who thought it wise to begin teaching his leadership skills at a young age. He was the first to have formal education in his large family. (Boston: Little, Brown & Company, …show more content…
Similarly, but not surprisingly, Gandhi also went to jail several times. They both believed if a person is willing to disobey the law, they should also be willing to deal with the consequences. Both men believed that people regardless of race should be entitled to their basic human rights not be mistreated in any manner. They both fought for their people in their homelands. They spend most of their time fighting ruling authorities in their countries. Gandhi was successful in reaching an agreement with the authorities, but it took Mandela 27 years to reach reconciliation. Mandela was more of a politician, whereas Gandhi was a nationalist. (Mahadev Desai). The biggest difference is that even though both men believed in the use of non-violence, Mandela believes violence can be necessary when the government terrorizes its people. Gandhi on the other hand, believed otherwise. He felt that violence is a result of cowardice, for if anyone can scare a person with a gun, but it takes a strong person to change the mindset of others. He believed that a person must govern themselves to govern

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