Summary: Mandatory Racial Segregation

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Since the United States turned into a knowledge economy, education has been the key to success. This success has mostly been awarded to the white. The United States has an exceedingly slanted school system which favors a high level of education for white children, leading to the higher level of success in life. This unfair distribution of education is reparable through mandatory racial integration of school systems in the United States and is necessary in order for children, regardless of race, to have true fairness in their education. It is false to say that the gap in scores between racial groups is unsolvable. Ira Glass reports that, at its peak, integration closed the gap between black and white thirteen year olds on standardized reading …show more content…
By all means of the court, governmental segregation is illegal. On May 17, 1954, the supreme court ruled racial segregation in schools as unconstitutional. Yet, over sixty years later, racial segregation continues to exist in the United States school systems. Not only does it exist, it pervades. "We 're more segregated in schools today than we were in 1947" says Sylvia Mendez. There is something inherently wrong when our school systems separate children by race even as we claim to no longer support segregation. Whether it is out of malice or not, the continuation of racial segregation is a warning signal that change is …show more content…
Schools integrate and then segregate. Minorities make their way in and white people make their way out. The main point is: integration will not happen on its own - it needs a push in the right direction. People have a very defined comfort zone and often do not step out unless forced to. As soon as mandatory integration is loosened, re-segregation occurs. When given the opportunity, white flight undoubtedly happens and, with the white families leaving, so does the money. Money that funds advanced placement classes and a rich curriculum with various extracurricular activities. Formerly thriving, integrated schools collapse in the blink of an eye. That is why, at least for now, integration has to be mandated. Sometimes the good of the general public has to come before the comfort of a

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