Racial Discrimination And The Civil Rights Movement

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communities where blacks had once been barred from voting, and many of the leaders or organizations that came into existence during the 1950s and 1960s remained active in southern politics. Southern colleges and universities that once excluded blacks began to recruit them. Despite the civil rights gains of the 1960s, however, racial discrimination and repression remained a significant factor in American life. Even after President Johnson declared a war on poverty and King initiated a Poor People’s Campaign in 1968, the distribution of the nation’s wealth and income moved toward greater inequality during the 1970s and 1980s. Civil rights advocates acknowledged that desegregation had not brought significant improvements in the lives of poor blacks, but they were divided over the future direction of black advancement efforts.” (Foner, Eric)
This is said to be true in America, Racism, inequality, slavery, oppression and sheer manipulation of the less fortunate and ignorant citizens of this country, yet it is not just here. In other parts and countries around the world, the common practice of slavery of its own people has been in the workings from the civilizations founding and presently accurate, working equally of body’s to the exhaustive state of bone. From the representatives of indentured servitude dating back as far as Egypt 5500 B.C., to the slave trading of the African body in Spain and Portugal in the 14th and 15th centuries, to the Trans-Atlantic Slave Trade in America

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