The Importance Of Minorities In Education

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Ethnicities in Education Since the beginning of time, people have been separated by many qualities. Most of all, people have been separated by their ethnicities. Different ethnicities of people used to be separated by laws or governing powers. Nowadays, minority students are separated from the majority by their academic standings. Researchers have proven many times over many different trials that some races of students do better than other throughout their education. The first way that researchers attempted to prove this idea was by looking at the standardized testing scores of many different high school aged students. The investigators were able to find that white students score eleven points higher on standardized math tests and over five …show more content…
The United States had discrimination against minorities in schools and had segregated schools until the 1960s . These discriminatory attitudes “mostly affected aboriginal inhabitants, African Americans, Hispanics, [immigrants, and] individuals with poor economic conditions” (Tamura). Researchers have also found that the location of the school plays a large role in the student’s education. Before the 1950s, black and white students were forced into completely different schools and they were not allowed to transfer between them. In those days, students were forcibly separated by the law. The laws were finally changed in the Brown v. Board of Education case but that does not mean that educational segregation is a complete thing of the past. Nowadays, students are separated by income rather than the law. On average, minorities live in poorer areas than white people and have to send their children to lower-funded schools (Henry). These schools usually have less teachers, fewer resources (books, classrooms, etc.), fewer classes, and poorly maintained facilities. “All of these factors can negatively impact the students’ academics and perpetuate inequalities between students of different races” …show more content…
The top kinds of reform are standards-based, school-based, and teacher-focused reform. The No Child Left Behind Act is a standards-based law that focuses on school accountability and standardized testing in order to make sure that all students have the same educational opportunities (“Public Law”). Another standard-based reform act is the Race to the Top program. “RTTT’s primary goals are to improve student achievement, close achievement gaps, and improve high school graduation rates” (“Fact Sheet”). Many mediations have taken place at the school level in an attempt to reduce the achievement gap. Some of the largest changes have to do with reducing class and school sizes, curricular reform, and improved teacher education programs (Chubb and Loveless). The final type of reform attempts to better prepare teachers for the classroom setting. Studies have shown that teachers affect students’ academic development the most. The main goal of the teacher-focused reform is to set higher state standards for a teacher’s necessary education and preparation (Darling-Hammond). While all of these reforms are helping to decrease the size of the achievement gap, white students are still performing at a higher rate than ethnic students ("The

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