Racial Ambiguism And Racism In Mark Twain's Huckleberry Finn

976 Words 4 Pages
Twain 's deceptive spread of racial stereotypes through his depiction of Jim and other blacks in Huckleberry Finn makes link to his use of "nigger" and has raised loud criticism from -Huckleberry Finn critics. Like the perception "nigger," Twain 's portrayal of blacks, Jim in particular, shows the tendency of the white culture to treat blacks with qualities that negate their humanity and refer to them as inferior. Critics mock parts that represent blacks as childish, less smart than whites, irrational beyond reason, and totally unaware of Standard English. In addition, they blame that in order to interest his white readers, Twain depended on the practices of "black minstrelsy." With the apparently harmful stereotypical descriptions of blacks, …show more content…
As an alternative, this should make it the essence of the American literature course. The mysteriousness of the race problem as concerns Huckleberry Finn purposes as a model of the important racial doubt of the American attitude. The engagement with Twain 's book offers one way for students to challenge their own private racial emotions. However, the difficulties of racial perception existing in Huckleberry Finn may never be reasonably explained for scholars or academics, the attention of them may have a realistic, positive attitude on the method in which America handles race in the future …show more content…
Local literature recorded the characteristic of cultures of many parts of the country that were missing the social and economic innovation, which, in Huckleberry Finn’s case, was the Mississippi River culture. Therefore, the book is about the community history and their life that has been missing of growth, the conception that Twain disliked. In fact, what makes Twain a modern writer is his hate of the idea of modernization and his experience of the deceptions of progress makes him one of the country’s social and political

Related Documents