Race And Gender As Themes In Alice Walker's In Love And Trouble

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A detailed enunciation of the author’s textual persona evidently contributes to the reader’s understanding and interpretation of the story. Language plays a central role in sustaining the community. Black values and life styles are strengthened within the American context when Black English is used. The black literary language not only shows love for life, but also the search and establishment of the self. This study entitled “Race and Gender as Themes in Selected Short Stories of Alice Walker” examines the dual afflictions of race and gender in the lives of African-American women and how Walker’s women overcome these afflictions and pursue their own selfhood.
The short stories are important in revealing the varied experiences of the African Americans. Right from Frances Ellen Watkins Harper to the African
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These women have their own way of coping with their afflictions- if they cannot resist openly or act, they speak and if they cannot even speak, they atleast imagine and bring meaning to their lives.
The collection of stories, You Can’t Keep a Good Woman Down (1981) look at the ways in which a black woman character, bound to the narrow sexist and racist parameters of society liberates herself from the oppressive system by constructing a counter-position to the established societal norms. The women here confront the issues of abortion, pornography, rape, inter-racial relationship, sado-masochism, etc. and use their own strategies to survive the oppressive issues. They consciously challenge the conventions unlike the women of In Love and Trouble, who are engaged in their struggles inspite of

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