Rabbit Proof Fence Analysis

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Register to read the introduction… Aboriginal people became economically marginalized and were exposed to new diseases. The consequence was massive depopulation and extinction for some aboriginal tribes. Land and property rights fueled an important civil rights movement in the 1970s. Aborigines spoke out for equal rights, and specifically for land rights for property that had been forcibly taken by British settlers. The Aboriginal Land Rights Act, passed in 1976, became instrumental in territories with tribal associations. The 1990s witnessed further rights milestones, including government legislation that returned a great degree of autonomy, and increased wages and welfare benefits to aboriginal …show more content…
The Nazi’s were putting Jews into camps and had their own eugenics programs. During World War II, Asian Americans were put into camps in the United States; however, what did surprise me was how long the Aboriginals were being held and administered into camps. The movie said this took place up until the seventies and that Molly’s own children suffered as she had. It makes me wonder if there were any resistance movements by the aboriginals and how much the British played a role in their mistreatment. Globalization brought the British to colonize Australia and it was their culture that they tried to forcefully assimilate the Aborigines into. The disregard for another’s culture and the implementation of your culture over another’s is called cultural imperialism. In the movie the half-castes face socio-linguistic discrimination as they are forbidden from speaking their own language and are required to speak English. They are given a different diet then they had as foragers. Furthermore, they are taught to pray and go to the white settler’s church. Mr. Neville explains that the half-castes have the “benefit of everything our culture has to offer” by being in the settlements. The whites believe that the “natives must be helped” and that what they are doing is right and …show more content…
In the movie, on the train ride to the camp, the girls are kept in cages like animals. I believe this excerpt from the Australian Psychological Society describes accurately how humans react to their environment. The physical landscape, or natural environment, plays a key role in the suffering of the young girls as they traveled miles striving for life. It is ironic that their lives are put to the test in their journey while their only objective was a chance at life. Figure 5: This picture depicts the rabbit-proof fence, the area the girls traveled for nine weeks on a 1500 mile

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