Rab Butler Case Study

1429 Words 6 Pages
The 1944 education act known as the Butler act, Rab Butler was the minister of education in the coalition government which was formed by Winston Churchill in 1940. This act raised the school leaving age to 16 and provided them with free universal schooling; Butler wished that schools would cater for all academic levels. It established an education system, with the power to implement change to local educational authorities. Education began to be shaped by the idea of meritocracy that individual’s should achieve their status in life through their own abilities and skills rather than being ascribed from birth which means they earn it rather than being born into it. The Education act brought in something known as a tripartite system, which chose …show more content…
The ERA introduced many types of provision this included all state students to be taught under a national curriculum. The purpose of the curriculum was to get the content of standards taught across all schools. The act also includes key stages. These settings set children into stages at various ages. Progress in a Key Stage may be of assistance in part of an overall assessment as to how the child is being impacted by any child protection issues (e.g. due to difficulties at home). However, a Key Stage should not be looked at in isolation in such circumstances and should be considered only in the context of the child’s presenting circumstances/abilities. (PGF 17/11/2011). Under the principle of marketisation in education which was then favoured and carried on by the new right in 1997, the new labour government which was ran by tony Blair and Gordon brown followed similar …show more content…
That helps to divide individuals and place them in their appropriate roles through the shifting and sorting theory. In this way people are prepared for their role in society and it identifies those who are best suited for certain jobs. Parson views education as being part of a meritocracy Parsons believes that education introduces values of competition, equality and individualism. In a meritocracy everyone is given equality of opportunity. Achievements and rewards are based on effort and ability which is known as achieved status. Parsons is supported in these views by Duncan and Blau who believe that a modern economy depends for its prosperity on using human capital the workers and skills. A meritocratic education system does this best. This concept of meritocracy is seen as essential to functionalists and supports the idea that education does aim to ensure children achieve their potential. However, Marxists theory conflicts with this ideology and suggests that education oppresses the less advantaged by restricting their opportunities to

Related Documents