Quotes On Jealousy In Othello

“Oh, beware, my lord, of jealousy!/It is the green-eyed monster which doth mock/The meat it feeds on.” (3.3.170-172). Such are the wise words of the famous villain, Iago, found in William Shakespeare’s Othello. A tragic play of jealousy and rivalry, many of the characters in Othello are doomed to a catastrophic ending—a misfortune beyond all ordinary worries. Though each character experiences unfavourable obstacles out of their control, the misfortune brought upon the characters in Othello is almost entirely due to their jealousy towards another character. Iago envies Othello and as a result he is tortured and eventually executed. Othello envies Cassio, whom he is tricked into believing is having an affair with his wife, resulting in Othello’s …show more content…
One of Iago’s leading motives for his devilish scheme was the idea that he believed Othello had slept with his wife, Emilia. Iago says, “I hate the Moor,/And it is thought abroad that ’twixt my sheets/He’s done my office. I know not if ’t be true,/But I, for mere suspicion in that kind,/Will do as if for surety.” (1.3.324-327). Iago is not quite sure if the rumour is true, however jealousy has such a strong grip on him that the mere idea is enough to enrage him. Later Iago tells Othello, “That cuckold lives in bliss/Who, certain of his fate, loves not his wronger,” (3.3.172-173). Here Shakespeare uses irony, as Iago is informing Othello that a man who hates the man whom his wife is cheating on him with lives in happiness—though Iago is attempting to cultivate his plan here, he is describing his own personal situation to Othello. In addition, Iago is envious of Othello because of Othello’s high status—Iago devises a plan to bring Othello to his downfall because he wishes he could have such a high position as Othello but knows he cannot. When Othello raises Cassio to lieutenancy instead of Iago, Iago’s hatred towards Othello intensifies. Iago says, “O sir, content you./I follow him to serve my turn upon him./We cannot all be masters, nor all masters/Cannot be truly followed.” (1.1.43-46). Here Iago introduces the audience to his plan—he makes it quite clear to …show more content…
Iago, Roderigo, and Othello shared the common fault of unchecked jealousy towards another character. Though each character experienced unfavourable circumstances, their failure to control their envy is what ultimately leads to each character’s demise. Shakespeare teaches the audience through the three discussed characters that jealousy often results in ignorance and hence tragedies. Iago holds a deep jealousy towards Othello and by the end of the play is sentenced to torture; Roderigo also envies Othello however he meets his very own death. Othello envied Cassio and ended up taking his own life. In Shakespeare’s Othello, characters meet their demise due to their own internal

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