Stare Decisis: Legal Rule

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Stare decisis is a doctrine or strategy of subsequent regulations or principles laid down in previous legal decisions. It is the explanation that maintains that previous decisions which are to be followed by the courts. This strategy dictates that the court must abide or adhere to decided cases. Stare decisis is a legal rule which dictates that courts cannot disrespect the standard.
The court must endorse prior decisions. In essence, this legal principle dictates that once a law has been determined by the appellate court (which hears and determines appeals from the decisions of the trial courts) to be relevant to the facts of the case, future cases will follow the same principle of law if they involve considerably identical facts. Stare decisis
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When applying the law to the facts of a particular case. The three common forms of reasoning are deductive reasoning, Linear reasoning, and Reasoning by analogy.
Deductive reasoning: Deductive reasoning is a logical process in which a conclusion is based on the concordance of multiple grounds that are generally assumed to be true. Deductive reasoning is sometimes referred to as top-down logic. Its equivalent, inductive reasoning, is sometimes referred to as bottom-up logic. Deductive reasoning is a basic form of valid reasoning. Deductive reasoning, or deduction, starts out with a general statement, or hypothesis, and examines the possibilities to reach a specific, logical conclusion
Linear reasoning: it’s a form of legal reasoning that is generally in use might be thought of as ‘Linear’ reasoning because its proceeds from one point to another, with the final point being the
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Oliver Wendell Holmes, Jr., Supreme Court Justice from 1902 to 1932, and active Chief Justice of the U.S. in 1930, wrote, “The life of the law has not been logic, it has been experience.” Certainly, realists disagree that the law is a scientific endeavor, to which deductive reasoning may be applied to reach a decision. Realists also recognize that, because judges often make decisions based on their political affiliations, the law has a tendency to lag behind social realities.

Positivism
Positivists take the view that the only appropriate causes of legal consultant are laws, rules, and statutes that have been endorsed by a lawmaking entity, such as federal and state governments, courts of law, and other administrative bodies. Positivists hold that rules, regulations, and philosophies may be deliberated as “laws” because failure to obey them may end in prohibitions. Positivists declare that such issues as conviction and ethics are only things people strive for, and should not be used by a magistrate when making a

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