Queen Victoria's Diamond Jubilee Analysis

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How did the British people see their empire at the end of the late nineteenth and early twentieth century? They saw the Empire evolving and even some devolving. For the people living in the British empire, during the turn of the century, Queen Victoria’s Diamond Jubilee was a time of pride and yet a time of growing insecurity about the fate of the nation, because of the concerns with status as an economic power, a strong anti-imperial sentiment was growing, and the resistance in Ireland. During Queen Victoria’s Diamond Jubilee, held from June 19th-24th, 1897, the British empire celebrated the Queen’s sixteenth anniversary to the throne. The whole country took part in the extravagate party. The Jubilee showcased the achievements that the …show more content…
The author of the book, Empire: The British Imperial Experience from 1765 to the Present, Denis Judd wrote the statement; “On this analysis, the celebration of Empire was both a means of highlighting British achievements and of boosting flagging national morale. It was a further manifestation of the imperative to use Empire as a means of diverting attention from fundamental failures and chronic uncertainty” (Empire, Judd, 1996, p. 140). What Judd meant by the statement was that British had used the excuse of the jubilee to flaunt the highs of the nation to help raise morale, but was it just a way for the government to trick the public into thinking things were going well. Yes, it was true that all got to engage in the festivities, form the very rich to the very poor. They ate enormous amounts of food, drank …show more content…
Joseph Chamberlain, who had been one of the most effective ministers, had resigned in October. Back in May, Chamberlain had precipitated a political controversy when he asserted that the Empire had a choice to make; “Between a strict adherence to the principles of free trade, which appeared to be failing the nation, and the introduction of a programme of tariff reform that would both boost the British economy and also stimulate inter-imperial trade through introducing a system of preferential tariff agreements between different countries within the Empire” (Empire, Judd, 1996, p. 187-188). Chamberlain had thought with the revenue that the tariff reform could generate, he could get pensions for older citizens and increase Britain’s economy and not rely on foreign trade. Even though Chamberlain had failed to get the Conservatives and Liberal Unionist allies to back him in his effort to make the tariff reform possible, he did get the ball rolling and started to make people think about the economic crisis that Britain could be

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