Nursing Handoff Report

Superior Essays
Evidence Table
A1 Quantitative Article:

Sand-Jecklin, K., & Sherman, J. (2014). A quantitative assessment of patient and nurse outcomes of bedside nursing report implementation. Journal of Clinical Nursing, 23(19/20), 2854-2863.doi:10.1111/jocn,12575

ququantitative (Indicate primary evidence chosen with an APA citation)
Background or Introduction The article is a quantitative assessment of patient and nurse outcomes of beside nursing report implementation. The areas that will be critiqued include purpose and problem statement, methods used to collect data, literature review, analysis of data and the research conclusion. Nursing handoff reports affect patient safety. Effective communication between nurses
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Plos ONE, 11(6), 1-12. doi:10.1371/journal.pone.0156100
Background or Introduction There have been no validated studies of the understanding of family members’ experiences during their loved one’s cardiopulmonary resuscitation, therefore this was the aim of this study. The abstract was structured and informative. The objective and problem statement were clearly defined. The interview method is congruous with the naturalistic paradigm of qualitative research. As a result of the unavailability of information no speculations can be made concerning the research subject. The fundamentals of the study are quickly identifiable in the introduction.
Review of the Literature The controversial issue relating to the subject of the study may be a factor in lack of information. Although a small amount of literature is available the subject matter is scattered and little attempt has been made to perform a systematic analysis. The emphasis has been on the disruptive and distressing features of the family members’ attitudes during cardiopulmonary resuscitation.
The thirty sources listed are relevant and correctly
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The method used in the collection of data is dependable and conforming to the natural paradigm. “570 persons in the homes of a loved one during cardiopulmonary resuscitation post cardiac arrest were randomized. The team routinely asked the family members if they wanted to be present in the intervention group. The control group experienced no deviation from the standard practice, which does not include the offer. Family members of those which survived were excluded from the study.” Phone interviews were the method used in data collection which may decrease the study’s overall consistency. The sample size was ample. The procedures used in data collection are clearly defined, recorded and transcribed which prevented bias. The approach was directed by grounded theory and based on constant comparison. The interviewer nor the interviewees had any prior experience with the subject matter or any medical background. Saturation was

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